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seifip says

For 4-5 years already I was thinking of getting certified with Flash and I am pretty sure that I would be able to get it… the only problem is that I am constantly loosing interest in it – it becomes absolute in no time, you have to renew it very often and for now I really didn’t find any use in it :/

I read a lot of articles on Macromedia, Adobe etc. about how useful the certification is but right now I can’t decide – is it worth it? Is it worth paying and losing time every 1-2 years?

Do you think it is useful? Are you certified? For what version of Flash?

thnx for any help, Philip Seyfi, divita.eu

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zado says

Personally I’m not certified in Flash. I don’t plan on too either. I feel that being certified in a such a program/language would really help me do anything. If your good at flash people will see, and you are good, I’ve seen.

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wickedpixel says

I think that a good portfolio doesn’t need any certification :P

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JWG says

yeah. In most lines of work, certification or a degree of some sort is god, but it would seem that in this line of work all you need is a strong portfolio. The work speaks for itself. I too have thought about trying a certification, but what i hear from employers is, they just want to see good work. Then I guess it’s all about finishing a project on time.

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trepn says

Most of the times these certifications are useful for a company not an individual. I myself have two Apple certifications which I obtained when I worked for an Apple Reseller which allowed the store to say they are a Video Solution Expert. I only displayed knowledge I already knew in an exam but I don’t believe I am much better than allot of uncertified people. So like wicked says “I think that a good portfolio doesn’t need any certification”, companies do. So if you were planning to pay for certification yourself, don’t! Go work for a company that pays for it or just know ;) you’re as good as a certified by flashing your portfolio.

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seifip says

Thnx a lot for your response :) That’s what I thought all the time…

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alexandrup says

Hi, I also have no certification in Flash, but i have given it a lot of thought lately though. A certification is a way you assure companies/clients you want to work for that you have the minimum knowledge in the area you want to work in. Although many don’t see this, but a certification is a gem on someone’s CV. I’m telling you this from experience.

For example, last summer i had my CV actively online, and I have 2 certifications for .net, in C# and ASP .net. I don’t know if it’s true, but i think that coincided with a shortage of .net developers in Iasi, RO that period…anyway, i got 8 job offers for .net, 3 of which were without an interview, just “come & work” – and that just because those 2 certifications. I had a friend that had to apply a dozen of CV-s and giving a lot of tests, for the same job category, of .NET developer. And we weren’t that far from each other in terms of programming language knowledge… You see, it could be quite an advantage.

I’m now convinced that any certification you might have, can only help you. Even if it’s from an older version, like Flash MX 2004 for example. If you want to get a job as a Flash developer, and you go say to an interview where it’s specified that you have to know ActionScript 2.0, your employer will know that the same ActionScript 2.0 was in Flash MX 2004 as it is now in Flash CS3 (same langauge, just some stuff added in the newer version) – but he/she will know that you have the necessary basic knowledge and that it will be easier for you to learn – so that’s an advantage, even if your certification it’s for a “deprecated” version of Flash.

I, for one, currently i’m going for an International English certification, then i’ll see what i can do about “Adobe Certified Professional” certification.

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