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j18 says

Hello All,

I love outsourcing help for my sites whether…in many case, it’s understandable that say, a web designer/coder would need wordpress access to your wordpress site.

So what’s the rule of thumb for granting such access in terms of security? How you do approach it?

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Raincutter says

I’m not sure, but I assume you are talking about user roles. If I’m right, here you go: http://codex.wordpress.org/Roles_and_Capabilities

In short, you can assign your member a role through cpanel. This role will allow you to control what that particular member can do in your blog.

Sorry if i got it wrong though.

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Shellbot says

I’m looking at this from the other side, as the one who usually needs the access.

Basically, if it’s a brand new site and they have nothing on there yet to lose most clients are happy just to throw me an FTP login (limited to the directory the site is in, obviously) to upload my work.

Sometimes, the client is worried about giving access to an existing site, so I just work locally as per usual but instead of uploading everything for them just send them a zip file with the changes and possibly a few instructions on how to upload.

If you decide to give out FTP details, just make sure you’ve set them up their own user/pass with only as much access as they need, and that you’ve backed up your site as it currently is.

p.s. sometimes I’ll work on a live site via FTP but that’s pretty rare and only when it’s things like “can you change this green colour to blue” or something that takes about 5 seconds.

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Raincutter says
MichelleDancer said
I’m looking at this from the other side, as the one who usually needs the access.

Basically, if it’s a brand new site and they have nothing on there yet to lose most clients are happy just to throw me an FTP login (limited to the directory the site is in, obviously) to upload my work.

Sometimes, the client is worried about giving access to an existing site, so I just work locally as per usual but instead of uploading everything for them just send them a zip file with the changes and possibly a few instructions on how to upload.

If you decide to give out FTP details, just make sure you’ve set them up their own user/pass with only as much access as they need, and that you’ve backed up your site as it currently is.

p.s. sometimes I’ll work on a live site via FTP but that’s pretty rare and only when it’s things like “can you change this green colour to blue” or something that takes about 5 seconds.

My bad I guess. I though it was just about main site access.

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Shellbot says

Ok ignore me I just crawled out of bed when I wrote that…

Set them up a WP account if you don’t want to share your own details, backup your site anyway just in case, and tada :p

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Raincutter says
MichelleDancer said
Ok ignore me I just crawled out of bed when I wrote that… Set them up a WP account if you don’t want to share your own details, backup your site anyway just in case, and tada :p

I think you stated the correct way to do it tbh.

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j18 says

thanks all for the replies…

actually, i need a custom wordpress theme built to replace my current one. designer needs “site admin side access details” to I guess verify a few things.

Just wondering if I am to make a new wordpress admin for him or something else?

THANKS AGAIN YOU GUYS ROCK .

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Raincutter says
j18 said
thanks all for the replies…

actually, i need a custom wordpress theme built to replace my current one. designer needs “site admin side access details” to I guess verify a few things.

Just wondering if I am to make a new wordpress admin for him or something else?

THANKS AGAIN YOU GUYS ROCK .

hmmm I’m still not sure but I’d stick to my last post. Make an account for him on the blog or just tell him to register, then assign him the role of either super admin or admin, whichever is suitable.

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