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themeitsu says

Well, believe me or not, but I’m working on my first theme for over a year now.

I didn’t know too much about WordPress when I started, now I know a lot more, but still I’m shocked it took me so long. I’d love to make a theme a month, but I think you have to be very determined and experienced to do that.

Of course I’m working on a pretty complex product with over 100 shortcodes (including some I’ve never seen around), over 10 widgets, 10 portfolio layouts, 9 blog layouts and massive admin options, over 10 color themes, two custom post types, 10 front page sliders, everything built from ground up.

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JPThemes1 says

Very good point onioneye planning is essential in developing a wordpress theme.

PD: some tips?
onioneye said
webinpixels said
let’s back to the topic guys ;) 2-10 weeks for concept/idea (the hardest part), 1-2 weeks for design, 3-5 days for HTML , 1 week for WordPress

My workflow is a bit different, but I have to agree that planning is the part on which we should spend a lot of time. I have found that taking the time to actually plan things out thoroughly, cuts back on the time needed to design and code the whole theme, by keeping you focused on the task, instead of being lost and having to constantly change the design, until it turns into something that you find esthetic and functional. Unfortunately, I had to learn this the hard way, but I’m glad I finally did.

Conclusion: never, ever start designing and coding until you plan things out. I know it’s tempting, but you won’t save yourself any time, if you skip the planning phase. It will actually prolong the time needed for you to make a good WordPress theme. So hold your horses cowboys, and plan before you jump into anything else. :)
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JPThemes1 says

:)Sounds great, hope to see your template soon: D

superfluous said
Well, believe me or not, but I’m working on my first theme for over a year now.

I didn’t know too much about WordPress when I started, now I know a lot more, but still I’m shocked it took me so long. I’d love to make a theme a month, but I think you have to be very determined and experienced to do that.

Of course I’m working on a pretty complex product with over 100 shortcodes (including some I’ve never seen around), over 10 widgets, 10 portfolio layouts, 9 blog layouts and massive admin options, over 10 color themes, two custom post types, 10 front page sliders, everything built from ground up.
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themeitsu says

Thanks bro, I hope it won’t let you down!

Can I get “The Slowest Developer” badge or something, please?

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onioneye says
PD: some tips?

Of course, Jorge. :)

When planning, the first and the most important thing to think about is what the users really need, depending on what kind of a site you are planning to make (portfolio, business etc.). Don’t design and develop anything only to your liking. Rather, think about the general public on ThemeForest. Educate yourself about them and their wants and needs. Look into the popular themes and see what they offer, that make their work stand out above the others. However, don’t try to copy the themes in hope you are going to get the same number of sales as the original ones. That’s almost definitely not going to work out.

You can integrate general things such as sliders that a lot of themes offer, but try to include as many features that are going to make your theme unique and better than the rest. However, don’t go overboard with these “unique” features and fancy effects. The key is to balance all these things out and keep it as simple as you can. Users love products that are simple to use, yet beautiful and functional.

Take this quote as an inspiration:

“Any fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” - Albert Einstein

By the way, superflous, if you are reading this, know that I’m not trying to bash on your method of making WP themes. However, maybe you should rethink you process, given that you have spent so much time working on a single theme, and not having it published yet. Also, please be aware that WordPress updates itself pretty regularly, so you are probably using a lot of outdated code in your theme, that you need to go over and rewrite to make it up to date. Besides, there is a possibility that it is not unique enough, and that reviewers from ThemeForest are not going to be able to approve it, until you make it more unique, which could cost you several more months of development, given the scale of your theme’s code.

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JPThemes1 says

thanks for all the tips:) onioneye

onioneye said
PD: some tips?

Of course, Jorge. :)

When planning, the first and the most important thing to think about is what the users really need, depending on what kind of a site you are planning to make (portfolio, business etc.). Don’t design and develop anything only to your liking. Rather, think about the general public on ThemeForest. Educate yourself about them and their wants and needs. Look into the popular themes and see what they offer, that make their work stand out above the others. However, don’t try to copy the themes in hope you are going to get the same number of sales as the original ones. That’s almost definitely not going to work out.

You can integrate general things such as sliders that a lot of themes offer, but try to include as many features that are going to make your theme unique and better than the rest. However, don’t go overboard with these “unique” features and fancy effects. The key is to balance all these things out and keep it as simple as you can. Users love products that are simple to use, yet beautiful and functional.

Take this quote as an inspiration:

“Any fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” - Albert Einstein

By the way, superflous, if you are reading this, know that I’m not trying to bash on your method of making WP themes. However, maybe you should rethink you process, given that you have spent so much time working on a single theme, and not having it published yet. Also, please be aware that WordPress updates itself pretty regularly, so you are probably using a lot of outdated code in your theme, that you need to go over and rewrite to make it up to date. Besides, there is a possibility that it is not unique enough, and that reviewers from ThemeForest are not going to be able to approve it, until you make it more unique, which could cost you several more months of development, given the scale of your theme’s code.
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premitheme says
superfluous said
Well, believe me or not, but I’m working on my first theme for over a year now.

I didn’t know too much about WordPress when I started, now I know a lot more, but still I’m shocked it took me so long. I’d love to make a theme a month, but I think you have to be very determined and experienced to do that.

Of course I’m working on a pretty complex product with over 100 shortcodes (including some I’ve never seen around), over 10 widgets, 10 portfolio layouts, 9 blog layouts and massive admin options, over 10 color themes, two custom post types, 10 front page sliders, everything built from ground up.

I wish you all the best, but.. what if it doesn’t sell well? nothing guaranteed here. Take in your consideration this point.

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premitheme says

For me, if I have an idea (and I always have one while working on the previous theme) it takes 3-4 weeks.

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shaki says

For a customer less then one month, as long as the design is approved. But been trying to fit my skills to what TF wants and my first one here is taking longer… :)

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