382 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
+2 more
blabus says

Alright, so I sent in a PSD templates, and it got rejected, with the cookie cutter ‘not sufficient aesthetic quality’ message, so I replied back asking for clarification. The reply I got back said (quoted):

1. The design is not aesthetic ready.
2. The visual hierarchy and usability is limited.

I sent in the same template coded, and didn’t get any of these messages, so I’m not really sure what they mean. Any help would be appreciated.

Here are some screenshots of the template:

http://www.labusdesign.com/simplesteel/1_Home

http://www.labusdesign.com/simplesteel/3_Portfolio

4327 posts ThemeForest Reviewer
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $40,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 50+ items on Envato Market
  • Member of the Envato Team
+12 more
Ivor Envato team says

They approve your coded version?

382 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
+2 more
blabus says
They approve your coded version?

Not yet, but it wasn’t rejected for any aesthetic reasons, just a few code issues.

2022 posts Review Manager
  • Has referred 10+ members
  • Has sold $5,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 50+ items on Envato Market
  • Member of the Envato Team
+12 more
jremick Envato team says

The template’s aesthetics (graphics, typography styles, etc.) aren’t ready for the PSD category. That’s not to say that the design isn’t nice or anything but just that it doesn’t provide enough unique aesthetics to meet the PSD categorie’s criteria. It is also a very simple design which will be much harder getting approved for the PSD category anyway.

Once you get the coded version approved we suggest removing the PSD version from the marketplace anyway so why not just get the coded version approved and move on to your next project?

382 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
+2 more
blabus says
The template’s aesthetics (graphics, typography styles, etc.) aren’t ready for the PSD category. That’s not to say that the design isn’t nice or anything but just that it doesn’t provide enough unique aesthetics to meet the PSD categorie’s criteria. It is also a very simple design which will be much harder getting approved for the PSD category anyway. Once you get the coded version approved we suggest removing the PSD version from the marketplace anyway so why not just get the coded version approved and move on to your next project?

Alright, thanks for the clarification. Although that does bring up another point I’ve been wondering about- Is it better to have a PSD -only version of a template up as well, or just include the PSD with the coded template? Like do you think there’s a large number of people who might only want to buy the PSD version of a template (maybe if they want to heavily modify it, etc.), or should be just force them to buy the full coded version?

2022 posts Review Manager
  • Has referred 10+ members
  • Has sold $5,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 50+ items on Envato Market
  • Member of the Envato Team
+12 more
jremick Envato team says

There’s been quite a bit of discussion on this in the past and the general consensus was that if you put up a coded version of it then include the PSD with it and remove the PSD . If someone does want to customize the design they will have to buy the HTML version to get the PSD but it’s not a whole lot more and it helps keep the marketplace from getting cluttered and confusing for buyers.

2268 posts Bird is the word..
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $500,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
+8 more
jonathan01 says

This is what I ALWAYS do – I create my template as PSD – upload and sell for a week or so then release the HTML – I then put a message on each product page advertising the other version – the simple fact is that if someone wants / needs to alter your design extensively they can save a few dollars and get the PSD version only – after all they will probably want to recode after making extensive alterations – the html is there for those that want to add a logo and their text and pop it on their server – it’s completely 2 different markets I feel and have always had good feedback from buyers.

It’s a choice thing for consumers which is never a bad thing imo.

2268 posts Bird is the word..
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $500,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
+8 more
jonathan01 says

I wanted to just add that my latest template (just went on sale today) was a minimal clean design and it took me quite a while to get it approved – nobodies fault – just kept being told things like not fancy enough etc – the detail is there – the time spent on organizing a clean template I feel sometimes takes longer than the – shall we say “usual” – anyways eventually I supplied links to 3 or 4 of the best selling PSD templates – try it yourself – quite a lot on that first page of results based on sales are VERY minimalist / clean in design.

I think that if the quality is apparent on a design it shouldn’t be denied access to a category because it’s too plain.

I know that a recent template that was originally rejected here in the past few weeks which is mainly white and has great text layout eventually got accepted and has had some fantastic sales – but again, was originally told it wasn’t embellished enough – embellishment does not equal good design – it’s the layout and use of colors plus the small details that should count – otherwise we will have a market place full of the usual templates found on template sites – glossy gradients everywhere like eye candy just to shine.

Great design is far deeper than a glossy visual appearance.

2022 posts Review Manager
  • Has referred 10+ members
  • Has sold $5,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 50+ items on Envato Market
  • Member of the Envato Team
+12 more
jremick Envato team says
I think that if the quality is apparent on a design it shouldn’t be denied access to a category because it’s too plain.

The PSD category is intended to be a place for designs that stand out from the crowd. That doesn’t mean they have to be complex or embellished but they will need to offer aesthetics of a higher than usual quality.

While this can be done with simplistic designs, I think it’s to be expected that it’s more difficult to be done right. Designers can’t just put together some basic graphics and typography, call it a simple and clean design and expect it to be accepted. Fine attention to detail will be necessary.

Yes, there are some simple designs that have been accepted but keep in mind that as TF progresses, the requirements will also progress. So when you compare your work to other authors’ work from 6+ months ago, it may not meet the criteria now.

I hope this helps to clarify the position of the PSD category.

2268 posts Bird is the word..
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $500,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 6 years
+8 more
jonathan01 says
While this can be done with simplistic designs, I think it’s to be expected that it’s more difficult to be done right. Designers can’t just put together some basic graphics and typography, call it a simple and clean design and expect it to be accepted. Fine attention to detail will be necessary.

I believe I already addressed this in this statement:

I think that if the quality is apparent on a design it shouldn’t be denied access to a category because it’s too plain.
Yes, there are some simple designs that have been accepted but keep in mind that as TF progresses, the requirements will also progress. So when you compare your work to other authors’ work from 6+ months ago, it may not meet the criteria now.

I couldn’t agree more – however if they continue to excel in sales it’s obvious that buyers want this style and as such we should cater our designs towards the buying public, as long as it is a good piece of design.

I think you may of mistaken my post as another author complaining on the review process – it was not that at all as I hoped I made clear – it was rather that the fact that a GOOD clean minimal design takes just as much “skill” to get correct as does a more “complex” design.

by
by
by
by
by
by