5310 posts The Dude Abides
  • United States
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
  • Elite Author
  • Bought between 100 and 499 items
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Author had a Free File of the Month
+5 more
CodingJack says

Flipping themes isn’t my main business, but I’ve done it a few times. As a developer, I like seeing all the “shortcodes”, “one-column/two-column”, etc. pages as it helps me to understand what the available options in the theme are. And when I see stock photos, Lorem Ipsum, etc. I’m able to think outside the box and envision my client’s content in place of it. But clients aren’t always able to do this. And I always have to tell clients, “All those menu items are pages are really put together for people like myself who understands the technical jargon. So don’t pay too much attention to it, and instead just let me know if you like the overall look of the design.”

I recently had surgery on my finger and am going to be starting expensive physical therapy. And when I visited their horrible website this morning, the first thing that crossed my mind was I should try and get these people to trade services. Sure I could just talk to them about hiring me, but it would be so much easier to just send them a few links and say “This is what your website could look like”. But I can’t really do that with most of the ThemeForest previews here because the previews are marketed to developers.

I have to imagine I’m not the only buyer who’s encountered this dilemma, and think it would be a huge advantage for theme authors to start offering two previews: One for developers, and one for non-tech customers. It sure would make pitching designs to clients a whole lot easier.

939 posts
  • Sold between 1 000 and 5 000 dollars
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Envato Studio (Microlancer) Beta Tester
  • Serbia
  • Exclusive Author
aleluja says

Well isn’t that the purpose of the “full width” or “typography” or “shortcodes” pages that almost all themes got, among the regular pages where content is put in place? Or you mean a specific and strictly instanced demo, like a real website would have? There is a potential drawback there, the instanced demo does not show all the possibilities of the theme. There should be many instances and I’m not sure if it’s worth it.

741 posts
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Exclusive Author
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Poland
  • Referred between 10 and 49 users
Orbital_Themes says

Any ideas what should be in these non-techie demos?

5310 posts The Dude Abides
  • United States
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
  • Elite Author
  • Bought between 100 and 499 items
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Author had a Free File of the Month
+5 more
CodingJack says

There is a potential drawback there, the instanced demo does not show all the possibilities of the theme. There should be many instances and I’m not sure if it’s worth it.

Yeah I’m not saying replace the regular demos. Those are really important for buyers like myself to be able to evaluate the theme’s options and potential. But for example, I was looking for a medical theme, so the second preview could just be a fake business with a more traditional menu like: Home, About, The Doctors, Testimonials and Contact. Something simple because I think a lot of the previews are so elaborate they can also appear overwhelming to clients who don’t have a lot of content.

741 posts
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
  • Sold between 50 000 and 100 000 dollars
  • Exclusive Author
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Poland
  • Referred between 10 and 49 users
Orbital_Themes says

I usually try to make my demos simple, with fake content, like you say. In addition to that I throw in one menu item with sub-menu item featuring the most prominent theme features or shortcodes. The thing here is that I try to keep my themes as simple as possible, as I dislike throwing overwhelming amount of shortcodes and ten thousand sliders into my themes. Just some basics, like columns, few buttons etc.

Having two separate demos would not be the best choice as the people viewing the demos would be one more click away from what they want to see and it could be confusing when you are presented with a ‘Choose version: dev version / noob version’ screen. I’m talking about non-techie buyers here.

5310 posts The Dude Abides
  • United States
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
  • Elite Author
  • Bought between 100 and 499 items
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Author had a Free File of the Month
+5 more
CodingJack says

In addition to that I throw in one menu item with sub-menu item featuring the most prominent theme features or shortcodes.

Great idea!

I’m not void of this issue either as my two html templates do exactly what I’m preaching against. But I’m going to talk to my partner about using that type of menu structure in the future. Seems like the best way to handle it.

3430 posts Ruben Bristian
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 250 000 and 1 000 000 dollars
  • Has been a member for 6-7 years
  • Repeatedly Helped protect Envato Marketplaces against copyright violations
  • Won a Competition
  • Bought between 100 and 499 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Referred between 500 and 999 users
+5 more
KrownThemes says

This would definitely increase our workload a lot, because we would need to create more than one “dummy demo” for specific niches, but it’s a totally great idea! I know that non-tech people buy what they see and even if you only put images specific to their niche, they believe that the website is for them..

Might do this in the next theme :)

939 posts
  • Sold between 1 000 and 5 000 dollars
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Envato Studio (Microlancer) Beta Tester
  • Serbia
  • Exclusive Author
aleluja says

But still, the niche demo may drawback clients who are afraid to look at tech-demo coz they think they are noobs.

I think a live page builder is the best way to do so. Give a niche website and a section with all the possible shortcodes and a page builder. That way both tech-clients and non-tech ones can experience full potential of the theme + you show how easy is to build a page.

5310 posts The Dude Abides
  • United States
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
  • Elite Author
  • Bought between 100 and 499 items
  • Referred between 100 and 199 users
  • Author had a Free File of the Month
+5 more
CodingJack says

But still, the niche demo may drawback clients who are afraid to look at tech-demo coz they think they are noobs.

I don’t think it needs to be called “developer preview”. You could just have a normal preview and then a “sample site” demo. Like Ruben said, it would be time-consuming, but for themes that are geared toward specific industries like medical, church, etc. it’s worth the effort I think.

Off topic: I don’t’ have anything against some of the popular “one size fits all” themes here, but I hate how they come up #1 in search for niche industries. These searches results should be manually edited IMO (just search the two industries I mentioned above to see what I’m talking about).

939 posts
  • Sold between 1 000 and 5 000 dollars
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Envato Studio (Microlancer) Beta Tester
  • Serbia
  • Exclusive Author
aleluja says

It can be difficult to make sample site, not only time consuming. You have to actually make something that is almost useful as a website and think carefully what you put there if it’s going to be effective plus you have to know at least some taxonomy of that niche. For example, let’s say the niche is bookkeeping, I have no clear idea what to put there. Looking at real bookkeeping websites is not good, it has a whole different purpose, the sample and the real site.

Also it would be cool if Envato had some kind of buyer survey an author can make to test how that strategy works. Ofc, it’s worth giving a try but how could you know if it really is worth it?

Off: How does that search work actually? It’s not sorted by anything – not date, nor sales, nor rating, nor page-views, nor by tag order (if there is one. they are sorted alphabetically on the page, maybe there is), nor by mentioning in the description, nor by content of the demo…

by
by
by
by
by
by