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sambotta
says

Steve Jobs smoked weed… then he went to India and smoked some more. Then he went back to his first love, computers & such and mastered the thing; all that in competition Bill Gates, who didn’t smoke.
Anyhow, I like the idea of life being a journey, not a destination.

@WickedPixel Mastery. The diving into new habits that most will not even try… Your work is similar to the concepts Steve Jobs really did insist on… Your work, WickedPixel, shows caring with a modern inexplicable feel that attracts people. A television pioneer and mentor has passed away years ago, but his insistence that I read “The Fountainhead” put the words in my mind that remind me of your work. It’s simple, yet intelligent and beautiful. Congratulations on your continued success.

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geannabell
says

It’s mind over matter.

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mymatch
says

Everyone has been in the same position at some point, even the authors with 10,000 sales and Super Elite status, they all started from 0.

It can seem harsh, the rejection cycle, but we all go through it.

Stick with it everyone who is striving to break through, one day soon it will happen for sure.

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Amrhamza
says

This snippet from an Ira Glass interview is what helps me the most. Such an inspiring message.

LOVE IT , REALLY TOUCHED ME .

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Themewich
says

Voice of dissension here:

“Every new project (or job, or hobby, or company) starts out exciting and fun. Then it gets harder and less fun, until it hits a low point-really hard, and not much fun at all.

And then you find yourself asking if the goal is even worth the hassle. Maybe you’re in a Dip-a temporary setback that will get better if you keep pushing. But maybe it’s really a Cul-de-Sac, which will never get better, no matter how hard you try.

What really sets superstars apart from everyone else is the ability to escape dead ends quickly, while staying focused and motivated when it really counts.

Winners quit fast, quit often, and quit without guilt-until they commit to beating the right Dip for the right reasons. In fact, winners seek out the Dip. They realize that the bigger the barrier, the bigger the reward for getting past it. If you can become number one in your niche, you’ll get more than your fair share of profits, glory, and long-term security.”

From a great book called “the dip” by Seth Godin that I highly suggest:

http://www.squidoo.com/thedipbook

Andre

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Crakken
says

Voice of dissension here:

“Every new project (or job, or hobby, or company) starts out exciting and fun. Then it gets harder and less fun, until it hits a low point-really hard, and not much fun at all.

And then you find yourself asking if the goal is even worth the hassle. Maybe you’re in a Dip-a temporary setback that will get better if you keep pushing. But maybe it’s really a Cul-de-Sac, which will never get better, no matter how hard you try.

What really sets superstars apart from everyone else is the ability to escape dead ends quickly, while staying focused and motivated when it really counts.

Winners quit fast, quit often, and quit without guilt-until they commit to beating the right Dip for the right reasons. In fact, winners seek out the Dip. They realize that the bigger the barrier, the bigger the reward for getting past it. If you can become number one in your niche, you’ll get more than your fair share of profits, glory, and long-term security.”

From a great book called “the dip” by Seth Godin that I highly suggest:

http://www.squidoo.com/thedipbook Andre
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Crakken
says

You could at least leave a comment after removing it moderator/staff..

RecycledRecitals
RecycledRecitals Recent Posts Threads Started
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RecycledRecitals
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I don’t know that ‘forgetting the crap’ you went through is the key. When I reflect on my current summer, I am allowed to chose to reflect on a summer of setbacks, or a summer of successes.

On paper, I’ve been rejected from 4 scholarships, 1 grant, 2 composer contests, 13 internship applications, 4 full time job applications (including a local grocery store and staples…) and I still have 3 more submissions looming around the corner. (my email archive button is ready)

I can chose to dwell and sulk, or I can chose to use it as fuel. I grew by leaps and bounds through every competition, and every future success owes its existence to my previous failures (more this summer than any other in my life; and coincidentally more growth this summer than any other in my life).

If you find yourself creating for the sake of reward, I think you will eventually dry out – I think the key is not in forgetting the past, but embracing it, lighting it on fire and using it to slaughter your way through the thicket.

Lastly (and I’ll be heading my own advice this evening as the setbacks continue to roll in) I recommend watching Pixar’s Ratatouille. For those who may have missed it; I believe it’s one of their most important films – a beautiful interpretation of the artist’s struggle through the wilderness.

For those who have seen it, I think it’s worth re-reading Anton Ego’s final note on critique.. it gives me chills every time and reminds me to keep on swimming:

“Anton Ego: In many ways, the work of a critic is easy. We risk very little yet enjoy a position over those who offer up their work and their selves to our judgment. We thrive on negative criticism, which is fun to write and to read. But the bitter truth we critics must face, is that in the grand scheme of things, the average piece of junk is probably more meaningful than our criticism designating it so. But there are times when a critic truly risks something, and that is in the discovery and defense of the new. The world is often unkind to new talent, new creations, the new needs friends. Last night, I experienced something new, an extraordinary meal from a singularly unexpected source. To say that both the meal and its maker have challenged my preconceptions about fine cooking is a gross understatement. They have rocked me to my core. In the past, I have made no secret of my disdain for Chef Gusteaus famous motto: Anyone can cook. But I realize, only now do I truly understand what he meant. Not everyone can become a great artist, but a great artist can come from anywhere. It is difficult to imagine more humble origins than those of the genius now cooking at Gusteaus, who is, in this critics opinion, nothing less than the finest chef in France. I will be returning to Gusteaus soon, hungry for more.”

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bobural
says

I never believed that this topic could get so many answers and it’s amazing to see that even though we are from different backgrounds, countries, culture or religion we all share the same aspirations…

once again thank you all!

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MartinVatev
says

The secret to success is WORK WORK WORK
When you want to give up … That’s the moment you most need to fight.

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