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Blinn
says

Hello everyone. :)

I’m putting together a language I call Czeek for a fiction series I’m writing, called Uniques United.

I want this language called Czeek to have grammar that’s not a carbon copy of English grammar. It also has a latin-based alphabet (like in French, Hungarian, Spanish, etc).

In any language whatsoever, how does its grammar differ from English? Feel free to point me to any resources that might help. :)

Any help with understanding grammar of any kind and how it works would be much appreciated.

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amabil
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Creattive
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I’d say one of the big differences between english language and many others is that they only have one “the”.

in english you only have “the”, the car, “the” man, “the” woman.

In many other languages, this word changes with the gender of the object. In French you have two words for “the”: “le” and “la”. le is for masculine, and la for feminine objects. While things like car have a specific gender in that language which needs to be remembered (i.e it’s not based on a rule).

In german you have 3 words for the: der (masculine), die (feminine) and das (no gender, things). So in german it is : DER Mann ( the man), DIE Frau (the woman), DAS Auto (the car). But not all things without clear gender have a DAS. So it is for example DIE Schule (the school), DER Tod (the death), so you have to remember it for every word, just like in French.

If you want to make your language more complicated you can introduce even 4 words for “the”.

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doru
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SamBerson
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Good luck, and please let us see the final books when they’re finished!

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Blinn
says

Thanks guys. :)

@ samberson – When the language is complete to the extent of practical use, you’ll hear about it. :)

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SamBerson
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Thanks guys. :) @ samberson – When the language is complete to the extent of practical use, you’ll hear about it. :)

Great stuff – :)

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Graphic-Studio
Moderator
says

This may help you compile: in spanish and other languages some definers come after the object, as in Casa Blanca for White House.

SapphireGuardian
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SapphireGuardian
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Hungarian is my native language and its one of the most complex, difficult, but also one of the most beautiful language (Women’s favorite. :) ). There are many words what you can only describe around in English as you don’t have a word for it. I’m a writer, writing in English and this is one of the hardest part, to translate my Hungarian thoughts into English.

The other differences; - Hungarian has 44 letters in the alphabet, English has only 26. - 98% of the Hungarian words and letters sounds as they’re written (One of the reasons for the 44 alphabet as they’re covering every single sound a human mouth can form and give a tone for it.). You don’t have to learn different pronouncation. Each letter has one, and as you write them in the words, that’s how they sound. - The order of the names is reversed. Family name comes first. In English my name is István Szabó, but the Hungarian order is Szabó István. - The order of the sentences is also reversed and Hungarian doesn’t have any surplus words, such as “Does”, “Did” as the words are transforming to show the past, present or future with tiny extensions. Such as if you have a sentence “I Love You”, which is “Szeretlek” in my language, it already shows whom to you refer. There is no “I” and “You”. Same with every other words. The words are holding the “I”, “You”, “He”, “She”, “It”, etc, etc… In English when you refer to a brother or sister you never know they’re older or younger. You always have to state that in the sentence. In Hungarian however we have different words for each, for younger sister, older sister, etc, etc… (This is similar to Native American Navajo where they also have this. Actually the old Navajo is pretty similar to Hungarian here and there.). - The Hungarian words has the magic that they’re capable to give you a colorful feeling when you hear them. Somehow each of the word describes everything perfectly, even if you don’t ever heard the word before, regardless you’re Hungaran. But when you hear it, you may feel what does that word mean. There are only very few exceptions, usually the ultra rare words, but in most cases the essence is in the words as a hidden explanation. - Hungarian is the best language for cursing. We’re capable to curse for more than a minute without even using the same word in that sentence. Okay, we’re not proud for this. But it’s making a rich language even richer. :)

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harmonikas996
says

I’d say one of the big differences between english language and many others is that they only have one “the”.

in english you only have “the”, the car, “the” man, “the” woman.

In many other languages, this word changes with the gender of the object. In French you have two words for “the”: “le” and “la”. le is for masculine, and la for feminine objects. While things like car have a specific gender in that language which needs to be remembered (i.e it’s not based on a rule).

In german you have 3 words for the: der (masculine), die (feminine) and das (no gender, things). So in german it is : DER Mann ( the man), DIE Frau (the woman), DAS Auto (the car). But not all things without clear gender have a DAS. So it is for example DIE Schule (the school), DER Tod (the death), so you have to remember it for every word, just like in French.

If you want to make your language more complicated you can introduce even 4 words for “the”.

Thank you a lot for this comment! Appreciate it!

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