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plaxtico says

Hungarian is my native language and its one of the most complex, difficult, but also one of the most beautiful language (Women’s favorite. :) ). There are many words what you can only describe around in English as you don’t have a word for it. I’m a writer, writing in English and this is one of the hardest part, to translate my Hungarian thoughts into English. The other differences; - Hungarian has 44 letters in the alphabet, English has only 26. - 98% of the Hungarian words and letters sounds as they’re written (One of the reasons for the 44 alphabet as they’re covering every single sound a human mouth can form and give a tone for it.). You don’t have to learn different pronouncation. Each letter has one, and as you write them in the words, that’s how they sound. - The order of the names is reversed. Family name comes first. In English my name is István Szabó, but the Hungarian order is Szabó István. - The order of the sentences is also reversed and Hungarian doesn’t have any surplus words, such as “Does”, “Did” as the words are transforming to show the past, present or future with tiny extensions. Such as if you have a sentence “I Love You”, which is “Szeretlek” in my language, it already shows whom to you refer. There is no “I” and “You”. Same with every other words. The words are holding the “I”, “You”, “He”, “She”, “It”, etc, etc… In English when you refer to a brother or sister you never know they’re older or younger. You always have to state that in the sentence. In Hungarian however we have different words for each, for younger sister, older sister, etc, etc… (This is similar to Native American Navajo where they also have this. Actually the old Navajo is pretty similar to Hungarian here and there.). - The Hungarian words has the magic that they’re capable to give you a colorful feeling when you hear them. Somehow each of the word describes everything perfectly, even if you don’t ever heard the word before, regardless you’re Hungaran. But when you hear it, you may feel what does that word mean. There are only very few exceptions, usually the ultra rare words, but in most cases the essence is in the words as a hidden explanation. - Hungarian is the best language for cursing. We’re capable to curse for more than a minute without even using the same word in that sentence. Okay, we’re not proud for this. But it’s making a rich language even richer. :)

you sure sound passionate about your language!
it’s cool to have the perspective of other cultures! :)

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dekurvajo says

Nice explanation SapphireGuardian, actually many East-Asian language has similar rules to Hungarian. For example the order in names: Surname > Given Names. Like Japan, China, Vietnam. You can see similarities regarding the genders. I would mention that in Hungarian a sentence could be question or even statement with the same order of words. What is mainly matters is the tone. This is also something what you can find in East Asian languages versus Indo-Europeans. Hungarian languages generally use appendices instead prefixes. And Finally, English (British) says: “Bollocks!” Hungarian says: “Kurvajó!” (literally means so fncking good) both could means very good or very bad depending on the actual situation or environment. But Hungarians mainly dealing with the word kurva (means cunt or adjectival “whore” instead of the verbal or noun”fnck” word.

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LawrenceRed says

@dekurvayo

Very good explanations. :)

Btw, do you know how to say Kurva or Bollocks in pitkern ? I’m curious about this rarely dialect from a long time …

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dekurvajo says

I dont know… i never been in Tahiti. I know a little Greek, they said something like “gamoto” but im not 100% sure is the same.

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crozer says

What I’ve noticed the most is:

In Spanish, you have rhythm and melody. You have lots of punctuation, starting from ¿is this a question? through el vehículo está allí up to a mix of both ¿hola, cómo estás?. Its core structure is, personally, quite simple.

In German, you combine words to create new words. For example, if you’re wondering how to say dentist, you mix the word teeth (Zahn) with doctor (Arzt) and get Zahnarzt. Another example: An airplane. An airplane is a flying thing. So.. Flug (flying/flight) + Zeug (thing) = Flugzeug.

Perhaps this helps you identify the differences between these languages and the English language. Good luck!

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Creattive says

Thank you a lot for this comment! Appreciate it!

You’re welcome :) Are you inventing a new language, too? :D

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DanThemes says

Unlike the English language, in the Romanian language the adjective is always placed IN FRONT OF the noun… you can use this as well. :D

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SamBerson says

Unlike the English language, in the Romanian language the adjective is always placed IN FRONT OF the noun… you can use this as well. :D

Actually, in English we would say: the fat dog or the hairy chest Adjective before noun.

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SapphireGuardian says

Nice explanation SapphireGuardian, actually many East-Asian language has similar rules to Hungarian. For example the order in names: Surname > Given Names. Like Japan, China, Vietnam. You can see similarities regarding the genders. I would mention that in Hungarian a sentence could be question or even statement with the same order of words. What is mainly matters is the tone. This is also something what you can find in East Asian languages versus Indo-Europeans. Hungarian languages generally use appendices instead prefixes. And Finally, English (British) says: “Bollocks!” Hungarian says: “Kurvajó!” (literally means so fncking good) both could means very good or very bad depending on the actual situation or environment. But Hungarians mainly dealing with the word kurva (means cunt or adjectival “whore” instead of the verbal or noun”fnck” word.
Yep, that’s also true, especially the similarity to East Asian languages. But as similar they’re, each of them are also that different (Maybe the Japanese is one of the closest to Hungarian, along with some ancient Native American languages.). And yes, I forgot that the tone also matters, just as you said. :)
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DanThemes says


Unlike the English language, in the Romanian language the adjective is always placed IN FRONT OF the noun… you can use this as well. :D
Actually, in English we would say: the fat dog or the hairy chest Adjective before noun.

Yeah, I meant after the noun, sorry. :)

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