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mharr765 says

Hello, If any of you dont mind sharing, I just wanted to see what type of pricing you web designers use.

Do you usually have a flat fee? Charge per hour? If so, usually how much? And what does that depend on?

Any info would be great, I just wanted to survey you all.

Thanks :)

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simnor says

Hi, it depends on so many variables, your location, your experience, your running costs etc. I’m not going to tell you how much I charge as most experienced designers wont because thats between them and clients, however I will tell you how I charge.

Normally its a flat fee for an initial design, coding etc according to the brief, any changes to the design are charged at the hourly rate after normally around 3 hours, then any extras they want is charged on the hour, from what I know thats how most designers work.

Hope that helps

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JeffreyWay says

Depends on whether the job is for an individual or a company.

Former = flat rate
Company = $75 per hour.

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jremick Envato team says

I used to live in a small town where people wouldn’t pay more than $25-30/hr for web related work. If I did any work for local people it would only be in my spare time and I could only charge about $30 max.

Other than that, when I was getting started I used $25-30/hr as my starting rate for other clients and went up from there. Now I use $45/hr starting and move up from there depending on what the work is.

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MDNW says

$60/hr is the rate that I use to generate all flat-rate bids – which I usually use on larger projects (defined as any project over 10 billable hours). I emphasize in each bid that the estimated time to complete a task is directly tied to the cost.

For smaller projects that don’t warrant a big flat-rate proposal, I just use the hourly rate and send a bill for my time at the end of the gig.

Standard rate for individual designers is usually between $20 and $55 an hour. Standard rates for individual web-coders can range between $15 and $125 an hour depending on skill, speed, efficacy, programming language, etc. with HTML /CSS only guys on the low end and Eclipse/Flex or other high level programming languages on the higher end.

Studio rates for Web Design & Development are usually between $75 and $400 / hr depending on a variety of factors.

The key here (and I would encourage you to check out the Freelance Rate Calculator at FreelanceSwitch) is that supply/demand and living/business expenses are all tied together. If you can’t drive enough sales to pay your living costs, you won’t stay in business for very long. If people aren’t willing to pay your individual rate because they don’t see the value in it, you won’t stay in business for long either. On the other hand, if you have more work than you can take on, it’s probably time to raise your rate (which is how I got to $60/hr).

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ThemeKioken says

Wow, compared to you guys’ hourly rate, I’ve been cheap. I’ve been billing all my clients and companies with a flat hourly rate of $45 US. I thought I was high but I think It’s time for me to raise lol.

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MDNW says

Oh – and in case anyone hasn’t actually seen the calculator before – check it out here: http://www.freelanceswitch.com/rates/ – it’s an excellent resource (in addition to others) provided by Envato’s site FreelanceSwitch. Hope that helps!

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MDNW says
Wow, compared to you guys’ hourly rate, I’ve been cheap. I’ve been billing all my clients and companies with a flat hourly rate of $45 US. I thought I was high but I think It’s time for me to raise lol.

That’s not necessarily the case – if your current clients aren’t willing to pay a higher rate (meaning that if you increased by rate by $5, they wouldn’t continue to hire you), your rate is just fine. I was at $45/hr for about a year – I’ve just been incrementally raising my rate (usually by about $5 a year) according to the demand for work and the amount that my clients are willing to pay. If you’ve been at $45 for a while and you feel it’s time to raise your rate, then try it out, see how it affects the demand for your services, and adjust accordingly.

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ThemeKioken says
That’s not necessarily the case – if your current clients aren’t willing to pay a higher rate (meaning that if you increased by rate by $5, they wouldn’t continue to hire you), your rate is just fine. I was at $45/hr for about a year – I’ve just been incrementally raising my rate (usually by about $5 a year) according to the demand for work and the amount that my clients are willing to pay. If you’ve been at $45 for a while and you feel it’s time to raise your rate, then try it out, see how it affects the demand for your services, and adjust accordingly.

Well since I never tried, I never knew how they would react on the rate if I raised the level. They always said the rate is fair, so that’s why I kept going on with $45 =)

But I like getting paid better with less clients, so raising makes sense for me =)

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CreativeMilk says

Depends on whether the job is for an individual or a company.

individual= between €10 – €32,50 per hour Company = €32,50 per hour.

Or i get payed by the project.

Note that my prices are in euros ;)

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