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DryThemes says

My 2 cents:

01. Sketch first, but not always.
02. Photoshop is a must. Full PSD site with all pages.
03. Illustrator for the logo or some vector elements (not always).
04. Html/Wp…

:)

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CodingJack says

I think it depends on what you are by nature. If you’re a coder, you’re going to design in the browser. If you’re a designer, you’re going to use Photoshop or Fireworks.

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VF says

Being a coder something funny happened with my latest 2 attempts. First made a quick framework directly on html/css/javascript and tested with Apple devices just to know it doesn’t perform well there and dropped continuing it. If I have to start something with Photoshop, it will make ‘fail’ into epic fail! :D

For my case, design phase comes after completing 40 to 70% of the whole project and before that stage, only abstract wireframe keeps things going.

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ibchrisb says

For me, I find it difficult to move between coding and design quickly, so a full PSD is definitely my choice. Once all of my creative juice has been spent (in a manner of speaking), I can crank up my right brain in the coding editor.

Swapping between a graphics program and a code editor is just too disruptive to my workflow.

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ThemeFuzz says

Hi,

I am in the process of creating my first wordpress theme . My process was simple :
  • 1. Create a basic wireframe
  • 2. Create a basic PSD file for the front page
  • 3. Started coding the theme
  • 4. Look at the PSD and the actual theme and realizing they are totally different
  • 5. Delete PSD file and code the rest of the theme ( i only kept the psd for different elements )

As a conclusion, i am not a good designer so for me it is easier to just code inside the browser. I create the HTML and CSS , open the page , play with firebug for small changes then copy the code inside the CSS file. For me it is a lot easier to do this as i am not so good with photoshop and now with css3 i can do a lot of design elements directly with CSS .

p.s. i always have a pen and paper next to me for drawing different wireframes when the inspiration hits me :)

Best regards, Stefan

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Themico says

Hello. I need at least a basic plan (wireframe and a “sitemap” for templates). Then i create from one to four PSD ’s templates. And then coding. Can’t imagine how you can do a nice design without trying it first in photoshop.

Last time i found a cool program which is very-very simple, and works ideally for me. It’s called FlairBuilder. After creating a sitemap of templates and few wireframes with some annotations i’m go to photoshop.

Also, i want to say that after finishing coding my templates looks very different from PSD ’s.

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graphic_dev says

I always start designing all pages in Photoshop first, but I do have the code in the back of my head all the time. It’s not like I add stuff that I would have no idea how to develop. So sometimes I might look up some jQuery plugins and stuff while designing and test them out, just to be sure that I don’t waste time designing something that I won’t be able to code.

And then I code it so that it looks (almost) exactly as in the PSD . If I have some new ideas when developing then I might make some changes in the PSD , but going back and forth like that can be very time consuming, so I try to be completely happy with the design before I start coding.

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chuck8 says

Thanks everybody for your replies! Definitly, we all have different procedures, and the best seems just to be the one that suits us best :)

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UniquePixelWeb says

It depends. If I plan to make the template design heavy then starting with Photoshop is must. But for minimal layout I don’t use Photoshop that much.

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chuck8 says

It depends. If I plan to make the template design heavy then starting with Photoshop is must. But for minimal layout I don’t use Photoshop that much.

Agree

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