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meks says

Hi everybody,

Personally, we don’t like how WordPress built-in customizer looks like at first place. It’s hard for the user to manage all the options there. Maybe we should use it only for some simple options, because it doesn’t offer to much possibilities. But, if we use some theme options framework as well, then why we should split sets of options on two different places. It’s also not intuitive for a user.

1. We use and suggest http://reduxframework.com/ it’s an options framework done to interacts with WordPress officiall settings API it just have a lot more options and it looks very similar to WordPress built in style in admin.

2. You can use this plugin too http://wordpress.org/plugins/options-framework/ if you want the options to work and look 100% WordPress

We agree that there are a lot bad option frameworks but WordPress built-in customizer just doesn’t feel like a good alternative as well.

Cheers!

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bravewhale says

Personally, we don’t like how WordPress built-in customizer looks like at first place. It’s hard for the user to manage all the options there. Maybe we should use it only for some simple options, because it doesn’t offer to much possibilities. But, if we use some theme options framework as well, then why we should split sets of options on two different places. It’s also not intuitive for a user.

The customizer should be used for ALL visual style options: background colors and images, heading colors, text color, div colors, etc. The customizer was designed to be a live preview design tool. It only makes sense to use it strictly for visual options.

Your options panel could still be used for other options like setting social network icon urls, etc, but the consensus says this should be added as a plugin any.

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greenshady says

I don’t understand why we’re still talking about options frameworks. WordPress already has two really easy to use systems for theme settings.

1) Theme Customizer: https://codex.wordpress.org/Theme_Customization_API

Use this for visual stuff (colors, images, fonts, etc.).

2) Settings API: http://codex.wordpress.org/Settings_API

Use this for non-visual stuff, which shouldn’t be needed much for themes. The great thing about this existing framework is that it’s tested by 1,000s of developers and millions of users on a daily basis. You can add any options your mind can dream up using it. And, as a huge bonus, it will always fit in with the current WordPress admin design.

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meks says

I don’t understand why we’re still talking about options frameworks. WordPress already has two really easy to use systems for theme settings.

1) Theme Customizer: https://codex.wordpress.org/Theme_Customization_API

Use this for visual stuff (colors, images, fonts, etc.).

2) Settings API: http://codex.wordpress.org/Settings_API

Sure, but we have just mentioned frameworks which are basically built on the WordPress Settings API. If the settings API is “easy to use” then we can call these frameworks “easier to use”. Most of the stuff is handled automatically, developers just need to specify arrays of data depending of the field types they want to use as settings. It saves a lot of time really, and it’s still WP friendly…

Personally, I don’t see a problem using theme options framework which relies on WordPress setting API.

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meks says

The customizer should be used for ALL visual style options: background colors and images, heading colors, text color, div colors, etc. The customizer was designed to be a live preview design tool. It only makes sense to use it strictly for visual options. Your options panel could still be used for other options like setting social network icon urls, etc, but the consensus says this should be added as a plugin any.

If there are a lot of options, customizer becomes hard to use and not so intuitive. I agree that good thing is seeing live preview of specific settings but on the other hand if I think as a user of my theme, I would rather have all the options in one place, big screen, with each option well described with additional text.

Users are not developers, they don’t mind about WordPress, they want to make the things running fast and easy, without additional thinking.

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ChapterThemes says

If there are a lot of options, customizer becomes hard to use and not so intuitive.

True, but a LOT of themes have way ( waaaaayyyyy ) too many options. So many options that you can hardly call them themes anymore, since the user almost have to do every little thing for themselfs. Sure some find this usefull, but i know also a lot of buyers are especially avoiding the ‘1 million options and 600 fonts’ themes.

I think you can perfectly create an almost fully visually adjustable theme with just the customizer – allthough i still have to find out – but i think its possible by say for example, not having every single item color customizable, but group items by color. This way it’s also more easy for the user to keep a desent design intact. etc.


..I would rather have all the options in one place, big screen, with each option well described with additional text.

Having a description with each setting is a good point…


Users are not developers, they don’t mind about WordPress, they want to make the things running fast and easy, without additional thinking.

Also true, but like a said – there’s also a lot of buyers who can’t work with too many options.

At the moment i’m trying for myself to have options as minimum as possible, while still having complete control over the theme. As for non-visual settings i’m looking into placing those just as regular settings pages. Without a blown options panel a theme feels so much more natural for some reason. But that’s just me – some can’t get enough of all those settings and want even more :)

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