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jawes says

This kind of experiments should be cherished by Themeforest/Envato.

http://justintadlock.com/archives/2013/09/11/the-themeforest-experiment-one-year-later
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pixelgrade says

+1 here

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Jar says

Here’s a good question: If a theme developer wanted to relearn how they handle theme creation, what resources would prove to be useful? The obvious one from that post: WP’s Theme Review Guidelines – What else?

Also, can somebody expand on the issues he poses in regards to theme & plugin integration? He is quick to state that he isn’t in it for the money, but I’m wary as that is exactly what a silver-tongued devil would say anyway. He ends the post with multiple plugs for his own plugins as well, which just makes me even more skeptical on his intentions.

As I understand it, he wants us to remove “hard-coded” features in favor of more general features provided by plugins, right? That seems to be the most resolute way to handle this for the developer’s side; it caters to the entire developmental team for a typical WP installation – Theme and Plugins.

I guess the crux of the matter is in the end, sales are what drive the market. In order to improve sales, users resort to the inclusion of custom features, for a more versatile product, as well as a marketing move. How can his solution be presented in an unbiased way, that would please everybody – Theme & plugin developers, as well as customers?

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Jaynesh says

I don’t understand what the actual experiment was? What I’ve understood is that he submitted an item, got around 100 sales and somehow revolutionized the theme submission requirements. Can somebody please explain?

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greenshady says

I don’t understand what the actual experiment was?

From the opening paragraph of the article linked above:

The major goal behind the experiment was to see if I could bring some awareness to other theme authors there about writing better code and playing nicely with the 1,000s of other themes and plugins out there for WordPress.
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greenshady says
Here’s a good question: If a theme developer wanted to relearn how they handle theme creation, what resources would prove to be useful? The obvious one from that post: WP’s Theme Review Guidelines – What else?

Can you be more specific? I can point you to many resources. Just let me know what you want to learn about. The Theme Review Guidelines are a good general set of guidelines for creating themes.

He is quick to state that he isn’t in it for the money, but I’m wary as that is exactly what a silver-tongued devil would say anyway.

The experiment itself was not about money. There was never any statement made about not being in it for the money in a more general sense.

He ends the post with multiple plugs for his own plugins as well, which just makes me even more skeptical on his intentions.

All three of those plugins are open source and $free. They’re available on the WordPress.org plugin repository. They were made as a result of the experiment to help theme authors and users. If you look at the three plugins, they’re all developed to be used in conjunction with themes.

As I understand it, he wants us to remove “hard-coded” features in favor of more general features provided by plugins, right? That seems to be the most resolute way to handle this for the developer’s side; it caters to the entire developmental team for a typical WP installation – Theme and Plugins.

Not necessarily hardcoded features. It’s specific to much of phase 2 of ThemeForest’s new theme submission requirements. Essentially, it’s about proper separation of plugin and theme functionality, at least the functionality that either breaks a user’s site or causes them to lose access to content they’ve created when switching to a new theme.

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GravityDept says

@ ShivakaminiSomakandarkram — That’s a legitimate problem for any widely adopted platform. It’s not pretentious to observe that and design an experiment to test it. It is pretentious to call the experiment pretentious and add nothing of value. Ahem.

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Aether-Themes says

I have to say reading the article changed my point of view a bit. Being one of those people that have seen WordPress themes and theme development only on this marketplace, and was introduced to WordPress on this marketplace, I think there is more to theme development than packing shiny plugins etc. The experience and compatibility of a theme should be on high prio for theme authors, and I am glad to see that envato are trying to make the change with the new requirements, because that means our community here won’t be stranded looked down on by the rest of the WP developers.

I think I like where the marketplace is going, and love the fact that I am just now beginning to dig into theme development at this stage of the marketplace development.

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Jar says

Here’s a good question: If a theme developer wanted to relearn how they handle theme creation, what resources would prove to be useful? The obvious one from that post: WP’s Theme Review Guidelines – What else?

Can you be more specific? I can point you to many resources. Just let me know what you want to learn about. The Theme Review Guidelines are a good general set of guidelines for creating themes.

He is quick to state that he isn’t in it for the money, but I’m wary as that is exactly what a silver-tongued devil would say anyway.

The experiment itself was not about money. There was never any statement made about not being in it for the money in a more general sense.

He ends the post with multiple plugs for his own plugins as well, which just makes me even more skeptical on his intentions.

All three of those plugins are open source and $free. They’re available on the WordPress.org plugin repository. They were made as a result of the experiment to help theme authors and users. If you look at the three plugins, they’re all developed to be used in conjunction with themes.

As I understand it, he wants us to remove “hard-coded” features in favor of more general features provided by plugins, right? That seems to be the most resolute way to handle this for the developer’s side; it caters to the entire developmental team for a typical WP installation – Theme and Plugins.
Not necessarily hardcoded features. It’s specific to much of phase 2 of ThemeForest’s new theme submission requirements. Essentially, it’s about proper separation of plugin and theme functionality, at least the functionality that either breaks a user’s site or causes them to lose access to content they’ve created when switching to a new theme.

I’d first like to preface by saying I was mostly playing devil’s advocate. I don’t know anything about the inner-workings of WP, but do try to attribute some logic where I can. That was my approach as a skeptic, but I definitely think there is merit in his claims.

As far as being more specific (In regards to your first quote) let’s say I wanted to start creating WP themes with the eventual goal of selling them on here. What would be the best course of action for me to take, in your opinion, having zero previous knowledge of the inner-workings of WP, or theme development? I’ve always been a design guy, but I want to branch out.

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