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roddinthemighty says

As a person who’s had a ton of rejections, I’d say it’s best to just trust the reviewers. When I had a series of rejections and was struggling to get a project approved, they were cool enough to give me pointers and tips (cheers placdarms!)

It’s just as everyone says – there are so many projects that it’s hard to give feedback to everyone.

Also it’s much more scary to get a project approved and then no sales. Then you will never get to know why, not even the “This File Did Not Meet Our Criteria” :D

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felt_tips Volunteer moderator says

Oh… and here’s a top tip. I don’t admit this very often as it’s a bit embarrassing, but it sometimes helps to get up out of your chair and physically imitate the movement… with your hands or your whole body.

Dance the movement that you want to create. It’s so much more intuitive and immediate than itty-bitty little keyframes and it helps you to get inside the personality of the movement… to feel the movement. And it’s all immediate… no keyframes, no easy-ease, no previewing. You can invent and refine a piece of movement in a matter of a few seconds.

Then sit down at your computer and translate what you just danced into motion graphics.

I’m not kidding!

-f.

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DanaosC says
felt_tips said
@Dan…

No-one on the forum can do the design for you. I think everyone has pretty much spelled out what you could improve. At the risk of offending (which isn’t my intention… just to be honest)

1. It’s too close to other things that exist. Colors and feel the same as Smudgethis’s file. Same track used as lots of other stuff, format of many of tginho’s stuff used.

2. Design quality. I find the design rather big and inelegant. It’s okay, but the balance, composition and so on feels off. The files that yours resembles get this balance just right.

3. Animation quality. This is where it falls down the most for me. The animation feels rather clunky. The edit and pacing don’t fit the music very tightly and there are lots of parts where it feels a bit flat, a bit static. In short, the movement lacks personality and dynamism, which the other files have in spades.

The reason the file was rejected is probably a combination of these factors. Had it been more original, then areas for improvement in the design and animation might have been overlooked.

If it’s any consolation, if the file had been accepted it probably wouldn’t have sold much, because there are plenty of other files around that are identical in almost every respect except they’re better executed.

You’re a young guy and just starting out. You’re obviously keen to make this work. But stay aware that motion graphic design takes years to learn. There are guys on these forums who have many years of experience. I’ve personally been using AE since before you were born. I can look at an animation and visualize exactly what and where the keyframes are. With the best stuff, I suspend my disbelief. The idea wows me; things move with a personality and an intention; the design surprises and delights; the mechanics of how it was created fade into the background and what it is takes center stage. This is what you should be aiming for. But be aware, this takes years to learn.

So take heart… Rome wasn’t built in a day.

Take your animation and be bold…. break it to pieces, improvise, surprise yourself, put it back together in a different order, make it totally different from Smudgethis or tginho’s work. Then put it back in the Upload queue. Even if it gets rejected a second time, you’ll have learnt a lot about yourself and about design.

Good luck, dude.

-felt.

Thank you a lot Felt,I don’t know if I will edit my project or just throw it in the bin,but i sure know something,I really learnt lots of stuff from this conversation.Thank you again pal! Have a nice day!

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DanaosC says

And of course THANK YOU ALL ,I really mean it,you are all fantastic people.Have an awesome day!

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Stormycub says
felt_tips said
Oh… and here’s a top tip. I don’t admit this very often as it’s a bit embarrassing, but it sometimes helps to get up out of your chair and physically imitate the movement… with your hands or your whole body.

Dance the movement that you want to create. It’s so much more intuitive and immediate than itty-bitty little keyframes and it helps you to get inside the personality of the movement… to feel the movement. And it’s all immediate… no keyframes, no easy-ease, no previewing. You can invent and refine a piece of movement in a matter of a few seconds.

Then sit down at your computer and translate what you just danced into motion graphics.

I’m not kidding!

-f.

Busted! :-P It’s true though!

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DanaosC says
felt_tips said
Oh… and here’s a top tip. I don’t admit this very often as it’s a bit embarrassing, but it sometimes helps to get up out of your chair and physically imitate the movement… with your hands or your whole body.

Dance the movement that you want to create. It’s so much more intuitive and immediate than itty-bitty little keyframes and it helps you to get inside the personality of the movement… to feel the movement. And it’s all immediate… no keyframes, no easy-ease, no previewing. You can invent and refine a piece of movement in a matter of a few seconds.

Then sit down at your computer and translate what you just danced into motion graphics.

I’m not kidding!

-f.

...Wow…After I read your post,I am now speechless..Great idea,not just great,Perfect! I will try it from tomorrow! I just hope my parents wont come into the room while I am doing it..XD I have to admit you really are a great Designer Mr.Felt!

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DanaosC says
placdarms said
felt_tips said
The powers that be check in on the forums occasionally. :) -f.

For this particular file i can say it lacks dynamics a bit. it feels like it stops every time before new animation happens. This is a tiny thing, but make it look clumsy. Also You’ve completely ignored title/action safe zones. Some text colors are too similar to their backgrounds leaving text unreadable. And the last logo animation is totally out of context.

To shed some light in the reviewing process – yes reviewers are using template rejection messages which usually are customized with reasons that apply to particular item. This is done to speed up the review process, because like Ken or someone said – in general the rejection reasons are the same. and it would be waste of time to custom write it for every item.

Also it’s important to know that reviewers are not teachers. We check what you’ve done and give our verdict if it goes with the reviewing guidelines, quality standards, site/buyer expectation or not. Reviewers are not there to design your project for you. if project can easily be fixed by improving some parts I’m more than happy to point that out. But if the file is less than 50% acceptable – most likely it’s not worth to point out every possible improvement. Otherwise reviewer would become an author of your item.

Also sometimes asking for improvement suggestions (rejecting reasons) is like showing a pile of rusty metal and asking why is that tractor not working?

I agree with you,but I have to say,asking for rejection Reasons and Improvement Suggestions is something different,Anyway Thank you for the reply.I’d like to know one thing though,What do you mean by “You’ve completely ignored title/action safe zones.”? Thank you again for the answer friend.

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white-shade says
InlifeThrill said
white-shade said
Ha-ha ))) Man, at least try to use another kind of music! http://videohive.net/item/summer/274476

Dont be too hard ot the guy, it has almost nothing to do with your project. It is never a bad time to throw a link to a project huh? No offence..

I think it needs some more movement and dynamics. If it had to do with copyright violation tha staff would have said so. The projects listed above are fairly new so the reviewers would have spotted it. Feels like everybody is way too senstive on the subject lately.

DanChristopoulos – it is not fair to expect the reviewer to list each frame you need to modify. Those are more of guidings than step-by-step instructions. I assume “the overall quality” means movement, design and technical part all together. I am sure you are gonna make it.

-inlife

Inlife, I do not agree with you, to be honest – I can hardly believe that the guy has not seen projects from me and Smudgethis. And please do not accuse me of trying to promote my project in the forum, since this type of advertising has zero efficiency and I do not use it. The fact that it looks like my project is absolutely clear for me .

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DanaosC says
white-shade said
InlifeThrill said
white-shade said
Ha-ha ))) Man, at least try to use another kind of music! http://videohive.net/item/summer/274476

Dont be too hard ot the guy, it has almost nothing to do with your project. It is never a bad time to throw a link to a project huh? No offence..

I think it needs some more movement and dynamics. If it had to do with copyright violation tha staff would have said so. The projects listed above are fairly new so the reviewers would have spotted it. Feels like everybody is way too senstive on the subject lately.

DanChristopoulos – it is not fair to expect the reviewer to list each frame you need to modify. Those are more of guidings than step-by-step instructions. I assume “the overall quality” means movement, design and technical part all together. I am sure you are gonna make it.

-inlife
Inlife, I do not agree with you, to be honest – I can hardly believe that the guy has not seen projects from me and Smudgethis. And please do not accuse me of trying to promote my project in the forum, since this type of advertising has zero efficiency and I do not use it. The fact that it looks like my project is absolutely clear for me .

To be honest for once again,I didn’t even know you,but yeah I saw Smudgethis’s projects.

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felt_tips Volunteer moderator says
DanChristopoulos said
What do you mean by “You’ve completely ignored title/action safe zones.”?

Back in the day when TVs used to resemble big glass bowls, the region towards the edge of the picture was often rather a messy affair, not to mention that the screens were not remotely rectangular. so the cathode ray-tube at the back would be set to scan off the edge of the picture area of the bowl like glass screen… a so called overscan. The wonderful gigantic teak cases would then cut a beautiful, as-square-as-possible template onto your grizzly black and white 525 line picture.

Since the advent of television, broadcast designers have been leaving 10% all the way round the picture, knowing that it would be cut off by the TV (the so-called action safe). They also respect a region (traditionally a 20% boundary round the picture) called the title safe. This is for when you’re using text – for example sports scores, lower thirds, astons etc. that makes the text extra safe and readable and gives an aesthetically pleasant spacing between the text and the edge of the screen.

Well… old habits die hard (or more to the point, the broadcast industry is very keen to stay 100% backwards compatible) and as we move into the digital age where screens are perfectly rectangular and the outer 10% of the picture is no longer fuzzy, the tradition has been continued of cutting off 10% of the picture right round the edge. Although most modern flat screen TVs will have an “underscan” mode, whereby you see the whole picture, most default to the old-fashioned cropping of the image. Probably, because many older images for broadcast have some unsightly stuff round the edge that was never supposed to be seen.

Whether Videohive authors should observe the safe zones is actually something of a moot point, since the vast majority will be for internet playback, where you see the entire picture.

However, I think the best policy is to observe the action safe margin fairly religiously and bear the other margin in mind. Understand what it’s there for and choose when to observe it. For big typo stuff, the title-safe is more or less irrelevant, but it you’re designing a lower third, for instance, you should observe it quite carefully and make sure that all your titles fall inside it.

You can turn the After Effect title and action safe margins on or off using the little icon at the bottom of the composition preview window.

Another useful trick is to make a layer the size of your comp. Set it’s scale to 90% and put it at the top of the layer stack. Set it’s blending mode to Stencil Alpha and lock the layer. That will show you your image with TV overscan framing.

Or try this as an alternative. Create an adjustment layer at the top of your layer stack. Add a Distort -> Transform effect. Set the scale to 111%, then lock the layer. Your entire image will scale up and crop of 10% right the way round.

-f.

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