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infuse01 says

Now at the first sight it seems to be a good move, but if you look closer on it, it becomes a bit more complex now.

Of course this move benefits all of us authors and developers alike and will help us to improve the web any further. But on the other hand there is a big player now joining 2 others – we have now Chrome, Opera and Safaria – all running on webkit, while we have still Gecko for Firefox and Trident for Internet Explorer.

As far as I know to establish NEW Webstandards we need at least 2 different engines having implemented/support them. So if webkit introduces a draft for a new webstandard they need at least 1 “competitor” – either Gecko or Trident having implemented that as well.

So if we imagine that IE moves over to either webkit or gecko (which won’t happen anytime soon for sure) it becomes a real problem to establish new webstandards. That in the end can lead to a very slow progress in terms of innovation.

Lets hope this won’t happen anytime soon.

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Parallelus says

Now at the first sight it seems to be a good move, but if you look closer on it, it becomes a bit more complex now.

Of course this move benefits all of us authors and developers alike and will help us to improve the web any further. But on the other hand there is a big player now joining 2 others – we have now Chrome, Opera and Safaria – all running on webkit, while we have still Gecko for Firefox and Trident for Internet Explorer.

As far as I know to establish NEW Webstandards we need at least 2 different engines having implemented/support them. So if webkit introduces a draft for a new webstandard they need at least 1 “competitor” – either Gecko or Trident having implemented that as well.

So if we imagine that IE moves over to either webkit or gecko (which won’t happen anytime soon for sure) it becomes a real problem to establish new webstandards. That in the end can lead to a very slow progress in terms of innovation.

Lets hope this won’t happen anytime soon.

This will never be an issue. The move made by Opera is an anomaly in my opinion. As technology progresses over time we should see more browser engines not less. It’s going to become easier to build them as we get better resources, new languages, operating systems and so on… I expect at some point another open source engine will evolve, or someone will fork one of them. If it is done well and get’s momentum someone will use it, even if it’s a new entry in the browser market: Samsung, HP, Panasonic, Dell, Amazon... There are plenty of big players and we haven’t seen the final evolution of browsers, not even close.

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infuse01 says

This will never be an issue. The move made by Opera is an anomaly in my opinion. As technology progresses over time we should see more browser engines not less. It’s going to become easier to build them as we get better resources, new languages, operating systems and so on… I expect at some point another open source engine will evolve, or someone will fork one of them. If it is done well and get’s momentum someone will use it, even if it’s a new entry in the browser market: Samsung, HP, Panasonic, Dell, Amazon... There are plenty of big players and we haven’t seen the final evolution of browsers, not even close.

Do you mean that a different implementation of the same rendering engine counts as a separate competitor for defining new web standards? If so than everything is good, but still having 1 rendering engine with 3 different implementations doesn’t make things easier, since they still vary from each other. I’m only saying “vendor-prefixes”.

But anyway, it’s a good move. Just trying to view things always a bit critiqual :D

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