3247 posts
  • Has sold $5,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
+1 more
organicbee says

So from a user perspective I personally hate responsive sites on mobile devices, whenever I see 1 I automatically look for “view desktop version”

now I also absolutely cant stand responsive themes on desktops.. to me theres no need unless you are doing something like a fullsize site if you have a static width site, say 960px it doesnt need to be made smaller on the browser re-size IMO

I think more of an adaptive approach should be used rather than using just min/max-width in media queries use min/max-device-width to target specific devices something like

/*Device Specific*/
/ipad
@media only screen and (min-device-width: 768px) and (max-device-width: 1024px) {
}
//retina ipad
@media only screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio: 2) and (max-device-width: 1024px) {
}
iphone
@media only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) {
}
//retina iphone
@media only screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio: 2) and (max-device-width: 480px) {
}

one negative side for doing that as theme authors is buyers wouldnt be able to “preview” on desktop browsers as it would be static

I do like the approach a bit on CSS Tricks though, something to ponder a better solution

677 posts
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $250,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has referred 500+ members
+11 more
cudazi Envato team says

I’ve had a surprising number of clients & buyers ask how they can disable or remove the responsive aspect of my themes. It honestly caught me off guard.

I didn’t dig further to see if it was a push from their users, clients or just personal preference but it’s a question I’ll definitely be asking in the future.

1045 posts Best-dressed man at PressNomics 2013
  • Has sold $1M+ on Envato Market and is now a Power Elite Author
  • Power Elite Author: Sold more than $1M on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+10 more
Parallelus says

Before you read this please keep in mind that I’m generalizing for most of my statements. Don’t take my comments below to be anything more than my personal thoughts and opinions. Ok, continue if you wish… :)

I’ve been mostly against the responsive trend from the beginning. I understand the need for a mobile version of a site. Mobile versions work to reduce bandwidth, simplify site structures and streamline navigation, etc. These are specialized and not just changes to the container sizes and other common responsive techniques. When a site is dynamic enough for users to create their own layouts and column structures it’s no longer possible to predict exactly which of those columns have important information and which can be hidden. That’s something a responsive design does automatically in most cases. A mobile site is independent from the design of a desktop version and you can specify exactly what content and information is pulled from the database and into the view port regardless of what the page looks like in the default site.

In many ways I believe what we are currently seeing with responsive designs is more of a fad than a step forward in user interface design. I’m not saying there aren’t good ways to do a responsive design, but I rarely see it being used for anything other than “wow factor” and to satisfy buyer expectations to get more sales. When you consider UI design, there should always be a reason for everything in a design. If you have a version of the design that adapts to 6 or 8 screen sizes you are losing some control over the presentation of your content. I see that as a negative most of the time.

Personally I feel the best use for responsive designs would be to accommodate variations in the design for larger screens. This allows a design to make use of extra space to show more navigation options and possibly increase advertising or supplemental content. That’s practically the opposite of what is being done now. I’m probably in the minority on this and I understand that.

One huge mistake I think a lot of buyers make is not thinking about their site visitors and considering if they actually want a different site when they use a mobile device. I personally can’t stand visiting a website on a phone and not getting the default site. I’m always looking for that “view full site” link so I can access it the way I do on my desktop. From my own exchange with customers and what I’ve read that’s pretty common. By not considering this most buyers end up wanting a responsive design because it’s “cool” and they think it makes their site “mobile friendly” or some other term that get’s misused when describing a responsive design.

I believe the responsive trend is probably here to stay, but it has to pass the test of time. Keep in mind that a lot of mobile devices are getting larger screens now and mobile browsers are built to adapt (zoom) to show sites. That leads to questions about the future of responsive designs. What happens when a device can track eye movement for scrolling and possibly even zooming. Ok, we’re not there yet but I’m playing devils advocate here. If we have better viewing for a full site because the browser technology and devices are improving the usability we have less need for responsive sites. The best comparison I can make is between a service that is available both through a website and a mobile App. You wouldn’t typically build your App to have the appearance of a responsive (smallest size) version of your website. Instead you would take advantage of the added features of the mobile device and limitations of the screen size to design your App. The same goes for website design in my opinion and their associated mobile sites. Just look at the Facebook website and the Facebook App on your phone. They are different for a reason.

624 posts Fuel Your Web
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Won a competition
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 7 years
+5 more
Pirenko says

At the very least, should there be an opt-out feature for responsive themes?

This totally makes sense. We (developers) should consider this as an option. Will implement it on my future themes ;)
624 posts Fuel Your Web
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Won a competition
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 7 years
+5 more
Pirenko says

I believe the responsive trend is probably here to stay, but it has to pass the test of time. Keep in mind that a lot of mobile devices are getting larger screens now and mobile browsers are built to adapt (zoom) to show sites. That leads to questions about the future of responsive designs. What happens when a device can track eye movement for scrolling and possibly even zooming. Ok, we’re not there yet but I’m playing devils advocate here.

We have to develop themes for today, not for tomorrow. If a client wants the website to render perfectly on all devices we should make it responsive. Also if devices are getting larger screens that’s great, because we have more space to give wings to our creativity, but in the meantime we have to work with what we have.
58 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United Kingdom
asifnm7 says

I would suggest that responsive sites are the future because they offer a far better experience – IF, and I repeat IF the ‘mobile’ version/layout is well designed. Just try and view the majority of ‘normal’ sites on a mobile and you will find yourself searching for information by zooming in and out, trying the navigate a site with ten odd links in the menu displayed across the screen and you can barely see the link or button without zooming right in. I think as the year passes and into the next year we will see designers getting far more comfortable and fully understanding what is required in the mobile layout.

5360 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

I really hate it when I visit a website and I’m taken to a mobile version. There should be a link so you can visit the regular website, if you choose to, or turn off the responsive madness.

I agree. The thing that pisses me off the most about browsing on mobile (aside from being constantly asked if I want to install their app) is when I’m forced to view a mobile version. Whenever this happens, I usually scroll to the bottom of the page to see if there’s a link for “full site”.

I added some Google Analytics to the last template I did which was responsive. And the thing that surprised me the most is how small of a percentage of traffic is coming from mobile devices (3%).

815 posts
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Contributed a free file of the month
+3 more
rvision_ says

Before you read this please keep in mind that I’m generalizing for most of my statements. Don’t take my comments below to be anything more than my personal thoughts and opinions. Ok, continue if you wish… :)

I’ve been mostly against the responsive trend from the beginning. I understand the need for a mobile version of a site. Mobile versions work to reduce bandwidth, simplify site structures and streamline navigation, etc. These are specialized and not just changes to the container sizes and other common responsive techniques. When a site is dynamic enough for users to create their own layouts and column structures it’s no longer possible to predict exactly which of those columns have important information and which can be hidden. That’s something a responsive design does automatically in most cases. A mobile site is independent from the design of a desktop version and you can specify exactly what content and information is pulled from the database and into the view port regardless of what the page looks like in the default site.

In many ways I believe what we are currently seeing with responsive designs is more of a fad than a step forward in user interface design. I’m not saying there aren’t good ways to do a responsive design, but I rarely see it being used for anything other than “wow factor” and to satisfy buyer expectations to get more sales. When you consider UI design, there should always be a reason for everything in a design. If you have a version of the design that adapts to 6 or 8 screen sizes you are losing some control over the presentation of your content. I see that as a negative most of the time.

Personally I feel the best use for responsive designs would be to accommodate variations in the design for larger screens. This allows a design to make use of extra space to show more navigation options and possibly increase advertising or supplemental content. That’s practically the opposite of what is being done now. I’m probably in the minority on this and I understand that.

One huge mistake I think a lot of buyers make is not thinking about their site visitors and considering if they actually want a different site when they use a mobile device. I personally can’t stand visiting a website on a phone and not getting the default site. I’m always looking for that “view full site” link so I can access it the way I do on my desktop. From my own exchange with customers and what I’ve read that’s pretty common. By not considering this most buyers end up wanting a responsive design because it’s “cool” and they think it makes their site “mobile friendly” or some other term that get’s misused when describing a responsive design.

I believe the responsive trend is probably here to stay, but it has to pass the test of time. Keep in mind that a lot of mobile devices are getting larger screens now and mobile browsers are built to adapt (zoom) to show sites. That leads to questions about the future of responsive designs. What happens when a device can track eye movement for scrolling and possibly even zooming. Ok, we’re not there yet but I’m playing devils advocate here. If we have better viewing for a full site because the browser technology and devices are improving the usability we have less need for responsive sites. The best comparison I can make is between a service that is available both through a website and a mobile App. You wouldn’t typically build your App to have the appearance of a responsive (smallest size) version of your website. Instead you would take advantage of the added features of the mobile device and limitations of the screen size to design your App. The same goes for website design in my opinion and their associated mobile sites. Just look at the Facebook website and the Facebook App on your phone. They are different for a reason.

Very well said.

131 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in Portugal
eddiesaints says

I agree 100% with Parallelus.

Responsive is nothing but “cool”, but that’s it. I prefer to follow the other option: Desktop / Mobile. Different UX environments, thus, different UI’s. With responsive designs, one of the UI’s won’t benefit and feel inferior. With a 100% mobile ready website made taking in consideration the device, UX can be improved taking those requirements.

I believe this is just a trend that won’t last long, I hope so.

169 posts
  • Has referred 1000+ members
  • Has sold $2M+ on Envato Market
  • Has been a beta tester for an Envato feature
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
+5 more
ait says

I just didn’t get responsive designs from the beginning ;) Standard websites are easier to navigate on your mobile, you don’t have to scroll and scroll and scroll, just zoom where you want to. The biggest extreme IMHO are responsive designs for iPad where you have pretty large and comfortable screen. Anyways, we went down that road because most of the customers were requesting it.

by
by
by
by
by
by