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Jonathan_Vivid says

Okay, I just got into all the screen casts this site offers. I completed Days 1-4 of the WordPress for Designers series by Drew Douglass. I’m following along the videos just fine, but I’m no expert in php. I’m wondering if I should pause the WordPress screen casts and start watching Jeffrey’s php screen casts.

In general, I’m a little overwhelmed, and I’m not sure what screen casts I should start with, as there are so many topics to choose from. I’d really appreciate some guidance. Thanks so much.

~Jonathan

Basic Info: I run Windows, I can work my way around html/css, but I’m no expert yet. Php is new to me, I’ve never used SQL or any database type things before following these tutorials by Drew.

If someone could just provide the order in which I should watch the screencasts, that would be most helpful. (WP, SQL , jQuery, php, etc).

^^

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luckykind says

yes… you should know and have good working knowledge with the languages before diving into Wordpress… that is if you’re going to be designing for it and want to be good at it…

if you’re not already pretty good with HTML /CSS… stick with that until you’ve got it down, then move on to scripting ->Javascript/JQuery… then move on to PHP /MySQL… then when you’ve spent some time building sites with all of those languages… then dive into the ins & outs of Wordpress… have fun, buckle up, don’t get frustrated… :)

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Jonathan_Vivid says

Thanks so much, Lucky! :] Basically, I should be able to build fully functional sites without WP before designing WP themes? Gotcha. I’ll focus a little more on the basics then.

Someone had told me to leave Javascript/JQuery for the last thing to learn, but I’ll follow your guide instead. :]

Just as a side note question, incase you come back to this thread, once you have a site built in HTML .CSS, is it difficult to turn it into a WP site/theme?

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QwibbleDesigns says

No, because your css generally remains the same, and you already have the html structure there, you just split it into template files and add the dynamic wordpress templating php =)

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Jonathan_Vivid says

Sounds simple enough! I figured it would be easier to go from HTML /CSS to WP then the other way around.

Is the dynamic WP php functions even necessary at that point, though? I mean, maybe for blog-like themes, but or other types of websites, is it necessary?

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ThemeBlvd says
Sounds simple enough! I figured it would be easier to go from HTML /CSS to WP then the other way around. Is the dynamic WP php functions even necessary at that point, though? I mean, maybe for blog-like themes, but or other types of websites, is it necessary?

The “dynamic WP php functions” are what the make the website “dynamic” and connect it to your admin panel. These simple little wordpress functions are supposed to be inserted throughout your HTML markup in order for the info to be pulled.

For example, instead of writing out the title of your website in the HTML code like this:

<h1>Your Site Title</h1>

You would do this so it pulls the actual title from your wordpress database.

<h1><?php bloginfo('name'); ?></h1>

This is how you go through and make your HTML /CSS into a Wordpress template, and you can see these wordpress functions are needed no matter what type of website you’re creating. It’s pretty simple.

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Jonathan_Vivid says

Thanks for clearing that up! I’m so glad people on this forum are extremely helpful and understanding to newcomers. Most other communities just bash noobs for asking obvious questions. Thanks! :]

One another thing I was hoping someone could clear up…when you design a site in html, you include all the pages as individual html files. Like, one for the index, about me, contact, etc. Where do those pages go when you convert it to a WP theme? I know that WP has the “add page” feature in the Admin Pannel, so do designers just get rid of all those extra pages? Are they incorporated into the WP theme in another way other than just html files?

Sorry I’m so inquisitive. :P

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ThemeBlvd says

One another thing I was hoping someone could clear up…when you design a site in html, you include all the pages as individual html files. Like, one for the index, about me, contact, etc. Where do those pages go when you convert it to a WP theme? I know that WP has the “add page” feature in the Admin Pannel, so do designers just get rid of all those extra pages? Are they incorporated into the WP theme in another way other than just html files?

Sorry I’m so inquisitive. :P

It’s important when building a Wordpress theme, that you understand the hierarchy of the template files:

http://codex.wordpress.org/Template_Hierarchy

But basically, in your theme folder you’ll create a file called “page.php”. This file will serve as the default page template. You’ll create it so it fits with your template by including the header at the top and the footer at the bottom, and then the wordpress function that calls the page content in the middle (basically).

Then in your Wordpress admin panel, when you go to “add page” you simply type in your content and it gets inserted within your template. This is the whole idea behind using a “Content Management System”. You’re not actually creating files for a Contact Page, About Page, etc… You’re creating them in your wordpress admin panel, the information get stored in the database, and gets display on your website from the single page.php template.

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Jonathan_Vivid says

One another thing I was hoping someone could clear up…when you design a site in html, you include all the pages as individual html files. Like, one for the index, about me, contact, etc. Where do those pages go when you convert it to a WP theme? I know that WP has the “add page” feature in the Admin Pannel, so do designers just get rid of all those extra pages? Are they incorporated into the WP theme in another way other than just html files?

Sorry I’m so inquisitive. :P

It’s important when building a Wordpress theme, that you understand the hierarchy of the template files:

http://codex.wordpress.org/Template_Hierarchy

But basically, in your theme folder you’ll create a file called “page.php”. This file will serve as the default page template. You’ll create it so it fits with your template by including the header at the top and the footer at the bottom, and then the wordpress function that calls the page content in the middle (basically).

Then in your Wordpress admin panel, when you go to “add page” you simply type in your content and it gets inserted within your template. This is the whole idea behind using a “Content Management System”. You’re not actually creating files for a Contact Page, About Page, etc… You’re creating them in your wordpress admin panel, the information get stored in the database, and gets display on your website from the single page.php template.

I somewhat understand what you’re saying now. I’m sure I’ll understand more as I get to fiddle and learn my way through everything, but what you’re saying sounds like when you’re running your own WP site. What about when you’re selling a theme? You don’t include the database, right? Don’t you just sell the folder that has all the html/css/psd’s etc. in it? That’s one thing that I’m confused about, when you sell products in the marketplace. What exactly are you selling?

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Ivor Reviewer says

You can see 1.000 hours of tutorials but you won’t learn in one week / month, is a matter of practice and time ;) It took me 4 years to achive my humble skills and of course I need to improve it even more.

If you’re watching an screencast the best way to learn is following all the steps.

Jeffrey’s screencasts are really good BTW – He have a PSD – HTML – WordPress tutorial in the Premium content of Nettuts+, you may want to check that out ;) just $9

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