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mordauk says

The other morning I received a rejection letter for my latest item, uploaded to the CSS category on Code Canyon.

It told me that my item was not of high enough quality in terms of design, style, uniqueness, etc.

Okay, that’s perfectly fine. I have no problem accepting that my item may not be good enough, or unique enough.

But here’s the problem. When an item is rejected, whether it is one of mine or of someone else’s, there really needs to be some sort of information included by the reviewer that provides at least some sort of feedback for how the author could improve the item. The submitted file is not good enough for CodeCanyon in terms of design, use of colors and uniqueness.

What does that tell me, and all other authors, about how to improve the item? In the past, when I have received rejection emails, I’ve responded with questions for the reviewer about how I could improve the item to the point it could be accepted.

Here’s the response I got:

It simply isn’t good enough.

Is that helpful in the slightest? No.

Rejection emails include statements encouraging authors to submit more items in the future, and to resubmit the rejected item after it has been improved. But how can authors who get rejected be encouraged to continually submit and improve items if rejection letters are so bland and unhelpful?

I am a reasonably well established author with decent success, but I worry about how rejection letters like these affect new authors who haven’t had anything published?

As a community, it should be Code Canyon’s goal, and the goal of all other marketplaces, to do its best to encourage new authors to submit items.

But if an author’s first item is rejected, and the email doesn’t give any specific reasons, and the reviewer is completely unhelpful when asked for further clarification, then how can that author be expected to try again? Would that author advise his friends to submit items? Probably not. I’m never going to try and claim that every reviewer should be required to write an extensive explanation for every single rejection; that would be ridiculous. However, I do think that reviewers should be required (or strongly encouraged) to include at least one or two short suggestions for improvement.

For example, if the reviewer of my item that was rejected the other morning had included something like this:

You could improve it by using smoother gradients and subtle borders, or providing more user-configured options.

I would have been happy, and would not be writing this novel. However, the reviewer did not do that, but instead made a blanket statement about the item’s overall quality without giving any sort of feedback on how it could be improved, and thus approved.

I know that reviewers have dozens of items to review every day, but how long can it take to include one or two sentences about how to improve the item?

These are just my thoughts about the issue, but I do believe it’s something that should be improved, for the betterment of the marketplaces.

P.S. My item’s rejection is by no means going to make me stop submitting items :)

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Philo01 Envato team says

Please contact the reviewer if you want more information. And please include the full statement of a reviewer instead of just a peace. Because there was a second reason, explaining that we require a more unique item.

But anyways, If you have any questions about your rejection, simply click the reply button to get in contact with the reviewer.

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mordauk says

Philo, I understand needing a more unique item, and I’m not just referring to the one rejection letter of my latest item, I’m referring to most rejection letters. Over my time as an author, I have received several rejection letters, and all of them have been very vague.

But anyways, If you have any questions about your rejection, simply click the reply button to get in contact with the reviewer.

I’ve done that before, and no further information was given. Obviously the sort of response will vary with each reviewer, but the times I have asked for more information, the reply wasn’t helpful in the slightest. That’s why I brought up this thread.

It would just be substantially more helpful, and more encouraging to aspiring authors, if rejection letters included at least one suggestion for how to improve the item.

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TutelageSystems says

I only submit into the PHP category right now and I know when a rejection letter goes out for that the reviewer usually will tell you why it wasn’t good enough.

If it just plain will not make it into the market place they normally just say it won’t make it because of X or Y or Z. However, if it has potential the letters that I received have always included a little information on what I need to do to put it on the market.

I agree that ever letter that goes out should have some more specifics on what your next steps should be, instead of contact the author for further details, it would just save time.

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jwmcpeak says

I agree. I know there are times when it’s difficult to do that because an item may have so many issues, but any information is good.

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mordauk says

I agree. I know there are times when it’s difficult to do that because an item may have so many issues, but any information is good.

Exactly.

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jrd89 says

I agree too with most of what you said. However, in my opinion the rejection letters should be a alot longer, with more details. I have had my fair share of run ins with vague rejection letters, most of the time when I’d reply with further details, nothing of substantial help was replied. I think that for the betterment of the marketplace, the reviewer should write a descriptive explanation. Half the time they are generic, it’s like seriously take the time to write the exact reason why you rejected it. Because if you took the time to think about what was wrong, put it down in words to help the authors. That’s the reason why you are doing the job you are doing. Rejection letters haven’t stopped me, but everyone is different and you could be losing the marketplace additional authors ready and willing to create.

PS. Just my opinion.

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jwmcpeak says

I agree too with most of what you said. However, in my opinion the rejection letters should be a alot longer, with more details. I have had my fair share of run ins with vague rejection letters, most of the time when I’d reply with further details, nothing of substantial help was replied. I think that for the betterment of the marketplace, the reviewer should write a descriptive explanation. Half the time they are generic, it’s like seriously take the time to write the exact reason why you rejected it. Because if you took the time to think about what was wrong, put it down in words to help the authors. That’s the reason why you are doing the job you are doing. Rejection letters haven’t stopped me, but everyone is different and you could be losing the marketplace additional authors ready and willing to create. PS. Just my opinion.

While I agree to some extent, I don’t think it’s feasible to detail every single thing that needs to be fixed. For example, many times there are patterns used throughout the code that needs to be fixed, like this:

$(this).foo();
$(this).bar();
$(this).kungFoo();
$(this).howdyDoody();

// later in the code

$("#someId").runningOutOfNames();
$("#someId").soJustGoingToTypeStuff();
$("#someId").coffeIsGood();

// later on in the code

$(".some-css-class").soIsDrPepper();
$(".some-css-class").imTired();
$(".some-css-class").somethingElse();
$(".some-css-class").laDeDa();

This is bad code since the objects returned from $() can be cached and used as opposed to continually calling $(). In a review, I’ll say something like:

As a general rule of thumb, cache objects you use more than twice in the same level of scope. For example, lines 10-14 can be rewritten as:
var $this = $(this);
$this.foo();
$this.bar();
$this.kungFoo();
$this.howdyDoody();

This code executes $() only once and thus performs a DOM lookup only once. Dealing with the DOM is expensive; the less you work within it, the more efficient your code is.

That should be sufficient. Even though I only used one example from their code, I shouldn’t have to point out all the other spots where the same bad pattern is used.

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mordauk says

@jwmcpeak

I definitely agree that it’s impractical to have reviewers give details on every single thing that needs work, but one, or perhaps two, would be a huge help.

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jrd89 says


I agree too with most of what you said. However, in my opinion the rejection letters should be a alot longer, with more details. I have had my fair share of run ins with vague rejection letters, most of the time when I’d reply with further details, nothing of substantial help was replied. I think that for the betterment of the marketplace, the reviewer should write a descriptive explanation. Half the time they are generic, it’s like seriously take the time to write the exact reason why you rejected it. Because if you took the time to think about what was wrong, put it down in words to help the authors. That’s the reason why you are doing the job you are doing. Rejection letters haven’t stopped me, but everyone is different and you could be losing the marketplace additional authors ready and willing to create. PS. Just my opinion.

While I agree to some extent, I don’t think it’s feasible to detail every single thing that needs to be fixed. For example, many times there are patterns used throughout the code that needs to be fixed, like this:

$(this).foo();
$(this).bar();
$(this).kungFoo();
$(this).howdyDoody();

// later in the code

$("#someId").runningOutOfNames();
$("#someId").soJustGoingToTypeStuff();
$("#someId").coffeIsGood();

// later on in the code

$(".some-css-class").soIsDrPepper();
$(".some-css-class").imTired();
$(".some-css-class").somethingElse();
$(".some-css-class").laDeDa();

This is bad code since the objects returned from $() can be cached and used as opposed to continually calling $(). In a review, I’ll say something like:

As a general rule of thumb, cache objects you use more than twice in the same level of scope. For example, lines 10-14 can be rewritten as:
var $this = $(this);
$this.foo();
$this.bar();
$this.kungFoo();
$this.howdyDoody();

This code executes $() only once and thus performs a DOM lookup only once. Dealing with the DOM is expensive; the less you work within it, the more efficient your code is.

That should be sufficient. Even though I only used one example from their code, I shouldn’t have to point out all the other spots where the same bad pattern is used.

I understand where you are coming from, but that’s javascript. When you are creating a php script / application with a little more complexity, a summary of all that’s wrong should be supplied. I’m not saying write a novel, lol, but a good summary, ya know?

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