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Siddharth Envato team says

True but when it’s an application, there may be far more errors to meaningfully point ‘em out. Specially when it’s an application, a reviewer has to look at the front and back end code as well as check whether it’s actually usable and contains features that make it unique.

Should we point out major flaws? Absolutely. Do we have to point everything that’s wrong? In my opinion, no.

If there is a single issue preventing approval, I make sure to state it quite plainly so the author can make a quick fix and resubmit. If the issues are too numerous, I politely tell him the implementation needs to be better to be considered for approval.

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jrd89 says

True but when it’s an application, there may be far more errors to meaningfully point ‘em out. Specially when it’s an application, a reviewer has to look at the front and back end code as well as check whether it’s actually usable and contains features that make it unique.

Should we point out major flaws? Absolutely. Do we have to point everything that’s wrong? In my opinion, no.

If there is a single issue preventing approval, I make sure to state it quite plainly so the author can make a quick fix and resubmit. If the issues are too numerous, I politely tell him the implementation needs to be better to be considered for approval.

The only problem is when there is a quick fix, not every time is it obvious. No offense to you but, other reviewers with soft of hard rejections have left vague details. We as author would just like it to be more specific , I know I cannot speak for everyone, but from my experience, I just am left questioning exactly what could be changed/altered for acceptance sometimes.

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jwmcpeak says

I understand where you are coming from, but that’s javascript. When you are creating a php script / application with a little more complexity, a summary of all that’s wrong should be supplied. I’m not saying write a novel, lol, but a good summary, ya know?

The example was JavaScript, but the concept applies to all languages. It just isn’t feasible to give a detailed readout of every issue found in the code. In many cases it would be a novel.

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jrd89 says


I understand where you are coming from, but that’s javascript. When you are creating a php script / application with a little more complexity, a summary of all that’s wrong should be supplied. I’m not saying write a novel, lol, but a good summary, ya know?
The example was JavaScript, but the concept applies to all languages. It just isn’t feasible to give a detailed readout of every issue found in the code. In many cases it would be a novel.

See that’s where I am finding it hard to believe. Being an author myself if I was a reviewer and if I took the time to come to the conclusion of what is wrong, I’d want the author to know exactly what was wrong. I don’t know, it could just be me, but I feel that the reviewer has an obligation to say exactly what’s wrong. I know that as the marketplace grows and more and more people submit, reviewers can at least give a great summary of what’s wrong. Whether it be javascript, css or a whole php application. And like I said before the only reason the reviewers have a job is because authors submit. Please take the time and effort to help us out, trust me it will be worth it in the long run not only for you but the whole marketplace.

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ThemeShaper says

Just a thought on this, and it may be a silly idea but would be it possible for reviewers to use some kind of standardised checklist with the reasons for rejection, for example:

REASONS FOR REJECTION :

1 poor code quality

1.1 lack of comments x

1.2 sphaghetti code

1.3 poor variable naming x

1.4 ...

2 documentation

2.1 incomplete / not enough x

2.2 badly written / difficult to understand

2.3 ...

3 functionality

3.1 lack of features x

3.2 too many similar products already in market

3.3 bloated with uneccessary functionality

3.4 …

5 aesthetics

5.1 bad alignment

5.2 bad use of whitespace

5.3 overuse of gradients / shadow

5.4 ...

6 working / broken

6.1 javascript errors

6.2 php errors x

6.3 item doesnt work as described

6.4 ...

7 copyright

7.1 copyright concerns with ___

7.1

8 closeness to acceptance

8.1 wont be accepted, fundamental problems with concept

8.2 a lot of work needed

8.3 moderate work needed (soft rej) x

8.4 little work needed (soft rej)

8.5 few minor technicalities needed (soft rej)

Add in the possible rejection factors, then the reviewer can mark off any areas which are problematic.

This would take some brainstorming for you envatosters initially to come up with the rejection reasons, but once the list is created it should only take a minute for the reviewer to mark off each time, and would give the author the feedback they want.

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