329 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Located in Albania
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
+3 more
Katro says

Hey guys i started reading some stuff about Ruby on Rails it it seems really interesting framework, but kinda complex, and a bit different from php, so i guess it will be a bit hard for me to start code semething, so i was thinking if ou guys know any good resources or any good books about it, i have a Sitepoint book, looks nice to get started but i was just wondering if there will be smth else to help me!

Be free to share any bookmarkes, or Screencasts you might have!

Cheers

444 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United Kingdom
TahaH-Studio says

The ruby category on NetTuts+. http://net.tutsplus.com/category/tutorials/ruby/.

I’ve learnt the basics of RoR form their. and trust me its not that complex as you think.

1173 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been a beta tester for an Envato feature
+3 more
Motionreactor says

I watched the weblog in 20 minutes screencast from the RoR site. I wasn’t impressed, it was just a technical show off with little to no explanation. I’m looking for more about the framework, language and the actual benefits of using it. The RoR site itself didn’t seem very useful at all from first impressions. I’ll have to check out the nettuts+ content… that may be better quality.

39 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
  • Located in Australia
ileitch says

The benefits of using Ruby/Rails compared to another high level language/framework are probably pretty subjective. In my experience the biggest advantage of using Ruby/Rails over PHP is effort required to produce similar products.

Rails especially makes heavy uses of conventions and in places the API can be very opinionated. This means that if Rails can provide extra functionality “out of the box” by requiring you to conform to a certain convention then it will do so, i.e in Rails when you create a Model (a database object) Rails will expect the corresponding database table to be inferred from the name of the model class. For example, given a class named Post, Rails will expect a database table named posts to exist. To this end Rails includes a library that handles grammar inflection so that it can figure out from any given word what the correct plural should be. There are plenty of features in Rails that work in ways like this – the big benefit is that you spend more time concentrating on your application code rather than configuration or boiler plate code.

I’d say read a few beginner tutorials for Rails and just start playing around, soon enough you’ll get a feeling for yourself what Ruby on Rails is like rather than relying on an article to tell you.

FYI : The marketplaces are built with Ruby on Rails, so I might be a little biased ;)

1173 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been a beta tester for an Envato feature
+3 more
Motionreactor says

@ileitch: Thanks for your response. That clarifies for me a few things I was wondering about.

For me, I think you are right… the decision would be subjective. I’m happier working with C based syntax of PHP and a framework like CodeIgniter or Kohana (It’s working well for me already). For now, it makes more sense for me. I’ll keep an eye on RoR, I’m still curious about it.

39 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 4 years
  • Located in Australia
ileitch says

I urge you to at least create a very basic app in Rails just to get a feel for it. I was also a little dubious about Ruby’s syntax when I first saw it. Ruby can be very succinct, which for a new person looking at the code may be a little off-putting, but once you actually know what’s going on you’ll learn to love it because it means you really can get a surprising amount done with very little code.

Write something in Ruby/Rails before you decide to stick with PHP ;) (I’d put money on you falling in love)

1435 posts
  • Has referred 200+ members
  • Has sold $40,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Member of the Envato Team
+12 more
kailoon Envato team says
I urge you to at least create a very basic app in Rails just to get a feel for it. I was also a little dubious about Ruby’s syntax when I first saw it. Ruby can be very succinct, which for a new person looking at the code may be a little off-putting, but once you actually know what’s going on you’ll learn to love it because it means you really can get a surprising amount done with very little code. Write something in Ruby/Rails before you decide to stick with PHP ;) (I’d put money on you falling in love)

I tried to learn RoR before, I must say, Ruby code is way easy to understand compare to php :) And it makes sense and fun. We can achieve a few things in 1 line of code which I need to write 2 -4 lines using php.

I am not the expert, just to share my experience :)

by
by
by
by
by
by