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CodeSwift
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I know little about the Settings API . As far as i understood you have to use it if you want to submit a theme to WordPress.org. But from what i saw it’s quite limiting when it comes to the layout of the theme options page.

I’m for Old School Theme Options Page.

You?

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Landonw
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WPScientist said
I know little about the Settings API . As far as i understood you have to use it if you want to submit a theme to WordPress.org. But from what i saw it’s quite limiting when it comes to the layout of the theme options page.

I’m for Old School Theme Options Page.

You?

I’m with you on this one, I find the settings API to be troubling and limited.

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pixelentity
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a shitload of php code to display a form ? thx but no.

BF

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CodeSwift
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pixelentity said
a shitload of php code to display a form ? thx but no. BF

I think it’s pretty much the same amount of PHP for both. Which one are you referring to?

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ParkerAndKent
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In my opinion the setiings api is too limitating… no option to add complex admin features jquery driven, then looking at the settings page of WP I can’t imagine to build my options in that way.

As I said on the envato notes blog about the top level theme options, looking at wordpress.org isn’t always good for premium themes like the one on sale here.

The free themes that go on wordpress.org are simple extensions of the base theme, they don’t add the 1% of what we do. I understand that over there is needed some standardization, but for premium themes is just absourd to follow each single rule of the theme check plugin or similar…

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CodeSwift
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ParkerAndKent said
In my opinion the setiings api is too limitating… no option to add complex admin features jquery driven, then looking at the settings page of WP I can’t imagine to build my options in that way.

As I said on the envato notes blog about the top level theme options, looking at wordpress.org isn’t always good for premium themes like the one on sale here.

The free themes that go on wordpress.org are simple extensions of the base theme, they don’t add the 1% of what we do. I understand that over there is needed some standardization, but for premium themes is just absourd to follow each single rule of the theme check plugin or similar…

I agree completely.

The reason i posted this is because i’m writing a series of tutorials about building a theme options panel (2 parts published, started 2 weeks ago) and saw a tutorial on wp.tutsplus.com about theme options from few days ago and 90% of the comments are “attacks” for not using the Settings API (in the third part which will go live in few hours i did mention Settings API and why i’m not using it in the tutorial in hope to avoid those comments).

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ParkerAndKent
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Well, I didn’t read the tutorial, but I’ve looked at the linked tut of Chip Bennet… well, for my options I make all the things they’re talking about, also if I don’t use the settings api.

I validate the input, I save the whole options set in a single option in the db as array, i use nonces, I check capabilities and I make many more complex things built on my needs… like profiling options to use different sets for different contents, setting default values and much more.

Probably the critics are for the tutorial itself, but spitting on custom methods that respect the good practices is just hating… I take care a lot about doing things in the best way, also if I’m not a super phenomenal developer aand I don’t use the settings API .

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FlexiPress
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We use Wordpress Settings API for our Theme Options… ;)

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bitfade
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WPScientist said
I think it’s pretty much the same amount of PHP for both. Which one are you referring to?
it’s not: you can use static html + javascript for the form and php only to validate/save.

with settings API , you have to use php for everything.
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CodeSwift
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bitfade said
WPScientist said
I think it’s pretty much the same amount of PHP for both. Which one are you referring to?
it’s not: you can use static html + javascript for the form and php only to validate/save.

with settings API , you have to use php for everything.

Using static HTML and JS is not what i meant as “Old School Theme Options”. I was referring to a completely dynamic system.

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