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Depard says

Thank you guys! Now I just need to think am I royalty-free music seller or rocker,who likes music. It’s my problem,I make Rock music,not soundtracks,couse I see difference between these things. I don’t know what I will do,but your advices will help me;)

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SonicCube says

Hello Depard ( reminds me of Def Lepard :) )

I can’t give you “THE” advice, and many important and good things have already been said. What i can tell, you can still make some money here, even if you don’t do corporate happy tracks. Look at my portfolio, i have maybe on or two of these tracks, and they don’t even sell very good :) My best selling tracks are the ones, where i just made what is coming out of me, without thinking to much.

So, go ahead, and wait a while for sales numbers to increae. My first year was also very slow regarding this.

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Reachground says

I’ve been following this thread with great interest. I feel your frustration Depard. Me too suffer from slow sales. My oldest submission is about two months old now but I still expect instant miracles.

I started by trying out different sites, making Audiojungle non-exclusive. After a while I chose to go exclusive though and at the moment all my assets are submitted to Envato only.

It’s good to get a reminder from SonicCube to be patient (not my best quality). I don’t have a good advice for you Depard, in the end it’s your choice. But it is worth at least one year of my time to see if things start to speed up.

Good luck!

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ProWaveAudio says

One thing that everyone needs to remember is that royalty free music generates sale over TIME . You can’t expect miracles over a couple of months nor will every item sell well. The way I see it is that if the income generated over 2-5 years was worth the effort in creating the item, then it was worth it, period. Be patient and ride the waves of the marketplace and judge the success of an item only when it’s at least 6+ months old. We all want to be paid on time when we work. But royalty free NEVER pays on time, expect your payment over the next 5 years. Relax and play the waiting game.

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Kerosene-Music says

Yes, great points. Treat it like the music item is an item in the stock market or an investment that grows over time.. Or say a mutual fund. It needs many years to “mature”. You don’t put $10 in a mutual fun and all at once it’s worth ten times that, it takes time. Decide on how much time you re willing to invest on a track and where you re willing to compromise a little for the marketplace. For me I know an average Joe job would pay about $200 for the day, so if it takes me 8 hours to complete a track, then I’m hoping a track would at least pay for my time by eventually earning that much… more over the years will be a bonus… the long term goal of being passive income. I’ve only created 4 or 5 tracks from scratch so far with Royalty Free marketplace in mind, the rest has been stuff I’ve done over the years that was just sitting around. One sold 3 times, I had it on my hard drive since 2004. I should have joined in 2008 or what not so it would have by now earned probably alot more over those years. I never thought they’d sell as they weren’t created with the marketplace in mind. So, better to have it out in the open getting some love 10% of something is better than 100% of nothing. I believe though that you can always have some of yourself and your passion in a track and that is never a bad thing. It keeps things a bit different and interesting as there’s only one you.

JC

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simaudio says

Yes, great points. Treat it like the music item is an item in the stock market or an investment that grows over time.. Or say a mutual fund. It needs many years to “mature”. You don’t put $10 in a mutual fun and all at once it’s worth ten times that, it takes time. Decide on how much time you re willing to invest on a track and where you re willing to compromise a little for the marketplace. For me I know an average Joe job would pay about $200 for the day, so if it takes me 8 hours to complete a track, then I’m hoping a track would at least pay for my time by eventually earning that much… more over the years will be a bonus… the long term goal of being passive income. I’ve only created 4 or 5 tracks from scratch so far with Royalty Free marketplace in mind, the rest has been stuff I’ve done over the years that was just sitting around. One sold 3 times, I had it on my hard drive since 2004. I should have joined in 2008 or what not so it would have by now earned probably alot more over those years. I never thought they’d sell as they weren’t created with the marketplace in mind. So, better to have it out in the open getting some love 10% of something is better than 100% of nothing. I believe though that you can always have some of yourself and your passion in a track and that is never a bad thing. It keeps things a bit different and interesting as there’s only one you. JC

Well said JC :)

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IDiewithguitar says

my “bestseller” is rock track, haha)

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ProgressNotes says

I feel similarly about certain types of music selling over others. Generally, my favorite pieces to compose are orchestral. Some of them create a very specific mood or feel, so I can’t expect them to be my best sellers, but I know when people do buy them, it’s for a cool project…especially when they buy an extended license!

My point is similar to a lot of other people’s; compose what you want and temper your expectations. It doesn’t hurt my pride when tracks I compose with a more “corporate” vibe sell more than others because I still composed them, and it’s still my creation that they decided to use with their media. How can a situation like that insult your pride?

Don’t leave AJ. Promote yourself as much as possible and the market will come to you.

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ZtarrZound says

First you need to decide why you are creating music – are you doing it for the sake of art or are you trying to generate revenue with your music. Most of the buyers that visit library sites are buying music for “corporate” use, corporate can have a variety of meaning but typically this is for a video, radio spot, tv ad, youtube video etc… They are looking for music that creates a particular mood and environment for their product or message. That is why “corporate” music typically sells better than other categories. At the end of the day if you want more sales you have to think like a buyer and create music that works for their needs.

If you are doing this for the sake of your art, create the tracks you like and some will sell, just not as many. I don’t think a different library will help you increase your sales much. Your rock tracks sound good but the market for them in the royalty free library world is smaller than other types of tracks.

At the end of the day you just have to decide why you are creating music.
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