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dtbaker Volunteer moderator says

Hey guys,

Has anybody added a “View Desktop Site” or “View Full Site” button at the bottom of their themes which basically disables any responsive stylesheets?

(this is for the not-logged-in end user – there is already a backend theme option to globally enable/disable responsive)

After clicking the button the end user would receive the entire full desktop site and can zoom in just as if it was non-responsive.

The button could be javascript which simply removes the stylesheet from the DOM and keeps a cookie to remember their choice, or it could save the choice in a session and remove the stylesheet on page load (bad for caching plugins).

Thoughts?

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CodeFusion says

I honestly cannot foresee myself using a mobile device and turning off the responsive state.

But, for the 3 extra lines of code, I can’t see how it would hurt. Just make a setting in a config JS to enable/disable the button – thus, giving the buyer the best of both worlds.

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ChapterThemes says

I honestly cannot foresee myself using a mobile device and turning off the responsive state. But, for the 3 extra lines of code, I can’t see how it would hurt. Just make a setting in a config JS to enable/disable the button – thus, giving the buyer the best of both worlds.

Indeed.

I only figured such thing as an admin option – which you allready have. For the few lines of code it might be a good feature to have.

Maybe you should also have it optional through the admin, so admin can decide if they want the ‘view desktop site’ link somewhere. Small effort – nice option

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FinalDestiny says

I consider it quite useless, why would someone NOT want their website to be responsive? And at least in modern grid systems like Bootstrap, since they use percentages only, I doubt there’s any quick way of making it non-responsive.

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FlatKing says

Depends what happens to the usability I always use outlook on my phone in non mobile mode

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dtbaker Volunteer moderator says

Yep I always hear complaints from people wanting to see the “full/normal” website due to decreased usability. Some wish to see the entire large website without having certain menu/graphics/cool stuff hidden or changed because of their small screen size.

and I personally prefer viewing some sites in ‘desktop’ mode from a small phone, especailly some of those ones that do a pesky ‘mobile’ redirect to a borked mini-site. the google chrome mobile ‘request desktop site’ does not remove responsive, just changes the user agent.

I might add it into the next theme and see what people think. Of course with an option to disable it (ie: remove the entry from Appearance > Menu).

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FlatKing says

For a tiny amount of code it isn’t that much hassle adding it in even if just 0.1% want to use it – Then again it’s more about the people viewing their websites

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Cubell says

Personally, I also sometimes go on “full-site” mode on websites, but that’s because the website’s responsive design isn’t very good or it’s simply difficult to navigate. If the responsive design is good, I would say it isn’t necessary to have an off switch.

Also, what are you building for? If you are creating a WordPress theme I’m not sure if this is that easy, because if I understand the new guidelines correctly:

“Keep media queries grouped by media at the bottom of the stylesheet.”

It sounds to me that you have to keep all your css in a single stylesheet, with the media queries in order. Or would you @import them at the end of the stylesheet? @import isn’t ideal for loading CSS and i’m not sure the trade off to turn responsive off is worth it.

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OriginalEXE says

It sounds to me that you have to keep all your css in a single stylesheet, with the media queries in order.

Of course not, no one restricts you to the number of actual css files. It’s just a rule that if you have media-queries in css file, they should be grouped at the bottom.

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Cubell says


It sounds to me that you have to keep all your css in a single stylesheet, with the media queries in order.
Of course not, no one restricts you to the number of actual css files. It’s just a rule that if you have media-queries in css file, they should be grouped at the bottom.

Yeah I get that, what I meant was that the main stylesheet will need its relevant media queries in the same stylesheet, which means that under the guidelines the responsiveness can’t be easily removed from the DOM with JS, unless a different approach (@import) is used or there’s a nice little trick with JS that I am unaware of :)

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