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LondonThemes says

I was thinking earlier and I came up with this concept that there are only 2 types of designing styles which is simple and detailed anything else would be in between. I know that if your theme or design is too simple or too detailed most people wont like it. My question is how do you guys find the perfect mix of both? Just curious…

Also what are some of the best simple and detailed designs in you guys opinion.

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Motionreactor says

Simplicity in design is often the result of recognising complexity. As you mature as a designer you slowly get better and better at seeing what’s most important, but also, and just as importantly, seeing what’s not. Once you see complexity for what it is, you realise it has no place in effective design.

Obviously there’s a grey area in between, but I think you can generally correlate complexity with young designers and simplicity with senior designers.

Stripping away the unnecessary elements of a design, removing the ‘decoration’ until you are left with the essence is the mantra. If every element, carefully considered, supports the message, the mood, the entire context…. it is at that point which you stop and recognise that nothing more should be removed, and nothing more should be added.

Beautiful writing or music is exactly the same. It says so much with so little, and nothing more.

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ParkerAndKent says

Simplicity in design is often the result of recognising complexity. As you mature as a designer you slowly get better and better at seeing what’s most important, but also, and just as importantly, seeing what’s not. Once you see complexity for what it is, you realise it has no place in effective design.

Obviously there’s a grey area in between, but I think you can generally correlate complexity with young designers and simplicity with senior designers.

Stripping away the unnecessary elements of a design, removing the ‘decoration’ until you are left with the essence is the mantra. If every element, carefully considered, supports the message, the mood, the entire context…. it is at that point which you stop and recognise that nothing more should be removed, and nothing more should be added.

Beautiful writing or music is exactly the same. It says so much with so little, and nothing more.

Good answer :)

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SaurabhSharma says


Simplicity in design is often the result of recognising complexity. As you mature as a designer you slowly get better and better at seeing what’s most important, but also, and just as importantly, seeing what’s not. Once you see complexity for what it is, you realise it has no place in effective design.

Obviously there’s a grey area in between, but I think you can generally correlate complexity with young designers and simplicity with senior designers.

Stripping away the unnecessary elements of a design, removing the ‘decoration’ until you are left with the essence is the mantra. If every element, carefully considered, supports the message, the mood, the entire context…. it is at that point which you stop and recognise that nothing more should be removed, and nothing more should be added.

Beautiful writing or music is exactly the same. It says so much with so little, and nothing more.
Good answer :)

Perfect!

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FlexiPress says

Simplicity in design is often the result of recognising complexity. As you mature as a designer you slowly get better and better at seeing what’s most important, but also, and just as importantly, seeing what’s not. Once you see complexity for what it is, you realise it has no place in effective design.

Obviously there’s a grey area in between, but I think you can generally correlate complexity with young designers and simplicity with senior designers.

Stripping away the unnecessary elements of a design, removing the ‘decoration’ until you are left with the essence is the mantra. If every element, carefully considered, supports the message, the mood, the entire context…. it is at that point which you stop and recognise that nothing more should be removed, and nothing more should be added.

Beautiful writing or music is exactly the same. It says so much with so little, and nothing more.

An amazing answer. Sums it up perfectly. The hardest part about being a designer is determining not what is left to add, but what has to be removed in order to achieve the most simplistic solution to a user’s need or desire.

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ThemeFields says

Simplicity in design is often the result of recognising complexity. As you mature as a designer you slowly get better and better at seeing what’s most important, but also, and just as importantly, seeing what’s not. Once you see complexity for what it is, you realise it has no place in effective design.

Obviously there’s a grey area in between, but I think you can generally correlate complexity with young designers and simplicity with senior designers.

Stripping away the unnecessary elements of a design, removing the ‘decoration’ until you are left with the essence is the mantra. If every element, carefully considered, supports the message, the mood, the entire context…. it is at that point which you stop and recognise that nothing more should be removed, and nothing more should be added.

Beautiful writing or music is exactly the same. It says so much with so little, and nothing more.

Pure essence! Love your folio and deign style. Your project documentation template is great. I think i will use it in my next project.

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Parallelus says

Simplicity in design is often the result of recognising complexity. As you mature as a designer you slowly get better and better at seeing what’s most important, but also, and just as importantly, seeing what’s not. Once you see complexity for what it is, you realise it has no place in effective design.

Obviously there’s a grey area in between, but I think you can generally correlate complexity with young designers and simplicity with senior designers.

Stripping away the unnecessary elements of a design, removing the ‘decoration’ until you are left with the essence is the mantra. If every element, carefully considered, supports the message, the mood, the entire context…. it is at that point which you stop and recognise that nothing more should be removed, and nothing more should be added.

Beautiful writing or music is exactly the same. It says so much with so little, and nothing more.

Excellent answer!

A professor was once reviewing a concept of mine and pointed to an area and asked “What does that do?”, I said, “It’s there to add style.” The professor replied, “If it doesn’t do something you don’t need it.” He was right.

That is something I’ve always remembered. If it has no purpose, your design doesn’t need it. That’s not to say I couldn’t have answered, “It helps balance the space between these two consoles to make theme feel closer together”, because that would be a purpose, but everything on your design should have a reason for being there, even the stylistic elements.

Motionreactor said it exactly right:

removing the ‘decoration’ until you are left with the essence is the mantra
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Motionreactor says

:) Recycled words mostly. I’ve learnt this from a mix of experience and from hearing others say it. Eventually it sinks in and actually makes sense, so glad to share the concept.

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VisualSharing says

It’s very difficult to make things simple.

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