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zzap says

It doesn’t have to look identical in IE8 , but it does have to be functional. If you’re using CSS3 to progressively enhance your template, you shouldn’t have an issue. Just include logical fallbacks for browsers that don’t support CSS3 . :)

Thank you, this helps a lot. Template is completely functional in IE7 and 8 but God, that ie.css is going to be filled. :|

Thanks everyone again.

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sevenspark Moderator says


It doesn’t have to look identical in IE8 , but it does have to be functional. If you’re using CSS3 to progressively enhance your template, you shouldn’t have an issue. Just include logical fallbacks for browsers that don’t support CSS3 . :)

Thank you, this helps a lot. Template is completely functional in IE7 and 8 but God, that ie.css is going to be filled. :|

Thanks everyone again.

You’re welcome :)

But you don’t necessarily need to have an IE-specific stylesheet to create CSS3 fallbacks. For example, If you’re using a background gradient you might have a progressively enhanced style like this:

.box_gradient {
  background-color: #444444;  /* this is your fallback */
  background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, from(#444444), to(#999999)); /* Saf4+, Chrome */
  background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #444444, #999999); /* Chrome 10+, Saf5.1+, iOS 5+ */
  background-image:    -moz-linear-gradient(top, #444444, #999999); /* FF3.6 */
  background-image:     -ms-linear-gradient(top, #444444, #999999); /* IE10 */
  background-image:      -o-linear-gradient(top, #444444, #999999); /* Opera 11.10+ */
  background-image:         linear-gradient(to bottom, #444444, #999999);
}

Example from css3please: http://css3please.com/

IE7 and IE8 automatically use the background-color: #444444; property because they ignore everything they don’t understand (like linear-gradient), so you get a flat background color. It doesn’t look as nice, but if you choose appropriate fall backs, it’ll still be totally functional. Plus, this way it isn’t specific to IE, but any browser that doesn’t support gradients.

If you want to use a background image to create a gradient fall back in older browsers, you can still do that, too. Here’s an example from Chris Coyier: http://css-tricks.com/examples/CSS3Gradient/

You can save the IE-specific stylesheets (probably only needed for IE7 ) for structural issues rather than styling. It’ll be a lot easier to maintain if you keep all of the styles together in the same file.

Hope that helps :)

Chris

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zzap says

Thank you Chris so much for your interest and effort.

In fact, I do have that code in my CSS file and that’s not the problem. Problem is in transparencies of black and white color I’m using for borders, shadows, separators, input fileds backgrounds and such small details. They do give solid color with content background but I have decided to use them for editing efficiency. Lets say a buyer wants a different background image then there’s only one line in css he/she has to modify to have the same effects on those details.

I have even found one great transparency generator for IE6 -8 here but it doesn’t play very nice with other IE spcific properties, probably because it usses those lovely ms filters. Also, there are a lot of elements with border-radius, bg color with transparency (which changes on hover state), box-shadow (with transparency)...kind of mission impossible for IE8 .

So, mainly, I just have to specify those transparent colors into solid ones and few structural moments I found looking ridiculous. Not really a big deal but it does need a fair amount of time to go through whole css file and filter all those rgba values. I guess it’s best I go back to work now :)

Thanks again

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al_m473 says

if you are an online user who has no interest in web design or not very technical, then I would think that there would be a very good chance that you will be using some version of IE. in my case, I have XP and IE8 is the highest level of IE I can use, along with Chrome and FF. I have 2 different computers I use and one won’t install IE8 so I use IE7 , and take my lumps. if your site does not display well and I am interested enough in it, I will open it using FF or Chrome, I don’t like the inconvenience of this but again if the content is worth looking at, I will do this. if not, I will just bypass your site. to me, the question is what users are you trying to address with your web site? and what browsers are they likely to be using? personal preferences don’t matter.

Al

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PixelBin says



You should know, though, that it doesn’t really matter what you should or shouldn’t do. It’s about the success you want your product to have. And if you are aiming high, take care of IE6 as well. Good code won’t break, unless you are using advanced techniques that, of course, can be ignored in IE6 ;)

Please oh please don’t support IE6 . Too many people have that mentality that if they support IE6 , you’ll get 500% more sales. You won’t. What you will get is massive headaches, bitter taste for coding, and maybe one or two sour buyers that still use IE5 .5 at home because everything is spoon fed to them and garbage like IE6 is still supported just for these people.

And before you say it, only about 0.01% of the themes here would even be considered by a “corporate” company that still for some unknown reason uses IE6 .

Please utilize modern techniques and say thank you to those that are using tools that make it easier for us developers, not those who are too lazy or ignorant to update their god damn Internet Explorer. Thank you, that is all.
I think I didn’t explain myself thoroughly. I am completely against IE6 , and IE in general to be honest. I was just pointing-out that what really matters are the clients’ needs and not what Envato dictates.

In that case, I agree 100%. I knew you were better than that, Crozer. :)

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rvision_ says

if you are an online user who has no interest in web design or not very technical, then I would think that there would be a very good chance that you will be using some version of IE. in my case, I have XP and IE8 is the highest level of IE I can use, along with Chrome and FF. I have 2 different computers I use and one won’t install IE8 so I use IE7 , and take my lumps. if your site does not display well and I am interested enough in it, I will open it using FF or Chrome, I don’t like the inconvenience of this but again if the content is worth looking at, I will do this. if not, I will just bypass your site. to me, the question is what users are you trying to address with your web site? and what browsers are they likely to be using? personal preferences don’t matter. Al

Al, can you tell me just ONE valid reason why are you using IE? You have Chrome and Firefox already installed, right?

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