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infuse01 says

Hello,

I’m currently in the process of setting up a website for one of my clients. I’m an experienced developer myself and it is the first time I work with a Theme from [name removed]. I really appreceate his work and respect what he has achieved. Unfortunately since I really “work” with one of his latest items I’m actually a bit disappointed. While you (envato) making it pretty hard in the review process (I failed several times myself) I would really love to know how a theme can come through which doesn’t allow to use child theme’s? Isn’t it that you’re pretending the wordpress coding standards all the time? But on the same page a theme gets through which effectively do something to prohibit the usage of a child theme?

As much as I’m concerned, Child Theme’s usually works out of the box – there isn’t even any need for a theme author to explicity ACTIVATE SUPPORT for it. The only thing what is needed is to create a new folder with a style.css where you set some specific data like themename, templatename,...THAT’s actually the point of CHILD THEMES. But in this case I have no idea what’ve been done so that the style.css from the child theme isn’t loading properly (and no, it isn’t an issue caused from myself – I had also the support staff from [name removed] confirming this issue (more or less).

While I know that you all earn a lot of money I would still strongly admit to soft disable this item until this issue gets resolved properly.

originally submitted as ticket to envato support, still would like to hear your opinion.

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cippo says

@infuse01

I totally agree with you regarding Child Theme support. I’m a bit disappointed as well when it comes to WP themes code.

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jk000jk says

As an experienced developer why do you need to work with themes in the first places? Second child themes are just bullish, more CSS bloatware that overwrites the main css.

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infuse01 says

As an experienced developer why do you need to work with themes in the first places? Second child themes are just bullish, more CSS bloatware that overwrites the main css.

Well, actually it doesn’t even matter WHY I need to work with themes. But if you will be happy: I setup a small shop for a friend of mine, and he is just fine with using a theme but only wants a few things customized. Those few things are custom styles and custom functions. For such cases WordPress offers the usage of child themes (that’s why they invented it dude). And usually there is no need for a theme developers to SUPPORT Child themes. No one is forced to add additional code to the parent theme just for the few clients who wants to use a child theme. That usually works out of the box. But not in this case.

That child themes are just bullshit is only YOUR Opinion. I have no idea who you are, where you from, or what you’ve done what qualifies you to make such statements, but I have a different view. Period.

But what’s more interesting is that on one side Envato and their Reviewers are always repeating how important coding standards are, while leaving some of the top authors the freedom to re-invent the wheel todo stuff which isn’t anythink like “standard”. That’s actually the whole point of this thread.

But, thank you very much for sharing your insights.

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aligatorstudio says

@infuse – please calm and carry on … :)
Don’t need to be argumentative – like you said – it’s just opinions …

FYI – jk000jk said “bullish” not “bullshit” ... It’s similar, but I believe that bullshit is a bit harsher, and it might be that it provoked you … ? Just an opinion … ;)

And (again, my opinion) I believe that child theme support shouldn’t be mandatory, and the theme child shouldn’t work out of the box … There are some themes with strong specific settings, almost everything is changeable from within Theme options … Because of theme options, some child theme matters can have issues (get_stylesheet_directory_uri() vs. get_template_directory_uri() ...etc..)

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webinest says

+1 on aligatorstudio’s reply.

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infuse01 says

I don’t need to calm because I’m not angry or anything similar ;-)

Well, what you’re actually saying is that coding standards are bullish and you probably even include shortcodes and custom post types directly within your theme instead of putting them into a separate plugin and ship them both together. Basically you don’t even care about your customers, right? Because that’s what you’re saying.

Disabling support for child themes? Basically the greatest “bullish” I’ve ever heard, sorry. A theme has support for child themes by default. There is actually nothing wrong with it. If a theme developer offers so many options he/she needs to find a way to implement them along the default proper way, instead of forcing users into a specific direction. I for myself don’t want to have the mess after an upgrade of the theme to re-implement all the stuff and custom styles over and over again only because the “Top Author” is too selfish and prefers to lock his clients/users into his system instead of offering enough space to let the user do what he/she wants. Funny enough that such themes still gets published under “100% GPL”...

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OriginalEXE says

infuse01 is right, there is absolutely no reason for not supporting child themes, that really should be a requirement or publishing them.

How else do you suggest customers should edit their themes without losing customizations on update?

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WPAlchemy says

Envato is a business, and as much as they try to tell us rules are the same for everyone, we all know top selling authors have it easier with reviewers than the rest of us mortals. I could name a few top selling authors that have over 100 themes, all pretty much the same as the previous one, but still get them accepted everytime.

You can’t blame them though, they are just trying to make the same thing we do… $$$.

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