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Parallelus says

One good thing, these changes are so uncomplicated they shouldn’t take up anytime at all.

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JonnyShogun says

I’d say with 99% certainty that theme options will obviously be in the theme. Clue is in the name, and as they only affect our own theme’s characteristics it’d be illogical to put them in a plugin.

Clue is in that PHASE 2 guidelines are IN DRAFT and subject to change based on feedback.

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popflier says

I feel like themeforest made these changes to the Wordpress theme submissions based soley from a developers perspective. Did you ever poll the users who purchase the themes to find out the following:

1) the users skill set and ability to make simple, medium, and advanced changes to themes they have purchased?

2) percentage of users who purchase the themes that are designers, developers, or none of the above?

3) how many users understand how to download/purchase, integrate, and configure plug-ins into themes they may have purchased?

4) why do users purchase the themes that they do? What is it that helps them to make their decision to buy this theme over another?

I am not a developer or a coder. I am a designer. I have purchased themes and done so based upon the functionality that I see in the demos. I have worked with Wordpress some and I have designed custom themes. I understand how it all works, which is why I can design the themes, but the coding portion doesn’t entirely make sense to me. So when I need to purchase a theme and install it for a friend, family member, or even myself, I always purchase the theme that has all of the functionality that I am looking for built into it. I don’t want to have to purchase a theme and then purchase some plug-ins and then hope that they will work together. More importantly, I am not confident enough at installing and integrating the plug-ins so that I can have them do what I want them to do. This is why I always look to purchase a theme that has everything I want already.

I could easily go and download some free theme somewhere and then hit up the Wordpress.org plugin repository and search for plugins to add to my theme. But i don’t want to do that. I don’t know which plug-ins are best (yes, there are ratings, but those are not always true) and I end up spending HOURS, DAYS, and even WEEKS trying to figure out how to make it all work the way I want it to. (I’m still trying to get my own website up and running from a theme that I purchased on themeforest nearly 3 months ago.)

While I may not understand all of the changes that you are talking about in the Wordpress submission guidelines, what I do understand is that by requiring the developers to make things like portfolios, booking systems, map systems, etc… into plugins that will need to be purchased separately or downloaded and installed separately you are effectively forcing me to make my theme purchases elsewhere. I come to themeforest to purchase all inclusive themes. I think Purethemes is 100% correct. This is going to cause more problems than you think and you will lose business because of it.

Ask your developers how many users who have purchased their themes will come to them with what you would consider to be “simple” questions? Questions to developers are going to be happen 100X more. If a user cannot figure out how to change the color of some text then imagine how challenging it will be for them to install a plug-in? And who do you think they will go to for help? That’s right…the person they purchased the theme from.

I think this is a huge mistake that you guys are making.

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popflier says

So we will be now selling simple themes with bunch of plugins? I guess it might not be a problem for themes from “blog” category, but what about this very niche themes, like for hotels with booking systems, restaurant themes, directory themes etc. I’m pretty sure it will cause more problems than you’re expecting. Imagine you have “directory” theme with full maps support etc, all functionality has to be provided by a plugins, someone buys it, changes the theme, and it works but doesn’t look good for obvious reasons. Who’s now to blame? Author of a original theme/plugin hybrid or author of new theme? It looks for me like we will be changing to ThemeCanyon.

I just wanted to tell you that i couldn’t agree with you more. I’m no developer, but as a user who has no idea what they’re doing this is going to be a huge problem. What if I do not install the plugin correctly? What if I do install it correctly, but now the formatting of the theme is all messed up. Who will help me to sort it out? I’d rather just find another website to buy a theme from that does include all of the functionality I need.

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teamCrisis says


I’d say with 99% certainty that theme options will obviously be in the theme. Clue is in the name, and as they only affect our own theme’s characteristics it’d be illogical to put them in a plugin.
Clue is in that PHASE 2 guidelines are IN DRAFT and subject to change based on feedback.

I suggest you read the first forum thread about changes. People specifically asked for theme options to not be in plugin since it don’t make sense to do. Evanto agreed and make it not required in plugin. No one is asking for theme options to be in plugin, so don’t expect it to change.

Why don’t you just accept fact that theme options need not be in plugin? We don’t understand why you continue to believe such thing when all evidence points to the fact that you are wrong about it. If you think it need be in plugin, then why don’t you just do it? Nothing is stopping you, but your time would be better spent on other things. Common sense and evidence clearly stated in forums and requirements page say you are wrong about it.

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JonnyShogun says



I’d say with 99% certainty that theme options will obviously be in the theme. Clue is in the name, and as they only affect our own theme’s characteristics it’d be illogical to put them in a plugin.
Clue is in that PHASE 2 guidelines are IN DRAFT and subject to change based on feedback.

I don’t think it should be in a plugin.. but @teamcrisis you are not envato staff, envato support, or JAPH. So until they respond back about whats said in support vs requirements page. I will go by the 3 emails from envato support regarding Phase 2. TeamCrisis, you telling me what you think makes no difference to me.. I don’t think you understand what IN DRAFT means! :)

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aligatorstudio says

After long consideration:
I think it’s very bad idea (for all – TF, authors and buyers), especially in long terms, to have Custom Post types and Shortcodes in plugin only. The very reason that TF themes made such a big success was the capabilities TF themes had “out of the box”, in my opinion. People was amazed (including me) what WP site can do, and that was exactly because of advanced theme possibilities (shortcodes, page builders, custom post types, media management … etc).

For the “proper” WP themes you have TF themes categories like “Blog/Magazine” and TF can also add – “Basic” or “WP.org compliant”, or “Approved by WP purists” (kidding) categories to conform pure WP philosophy (and avoid some legal issues, too ?) .

I remember, before our TF times :) , when I tested some themes – they required installing, like , 10 plugins, and then after that uninstalling them. Some themes had semi-automatic plugin uninstall routines, but, all in all, it was a nag …

I believe that WP themes Standard Submission Requirements (Phase One) are more then welcome and it’s more then needed for theme authors to conform those – I salute and applaud to making reqs publically accessible, BUT – Long Term Submission Requirements (Phase Two) – absolutely NO vote from us.

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UBLThemes says

I have a question if you could kindly answer :)

You are making meta data and custom post types go into plugins.

At the moment Envato are pushing WMPL Compatibility but by doing this, it will not be compatible.

For instance, you have to submit the wpml-config.xml to the theme with all custom-fields, post types, taxonomies etc etc.

What Ive read so far is that you are asking for the themes to still work at a basic level if the plugins are not installed.

That means that there will be big errors until the plugins are installed.

This alone makes the theme not compatible, after all plugins are not themes.

Do we still cater for the WPML within the theme or the plugin, if you do it on the plugin, it will cause errors within the next theme it goes on.

Do we cater for the WPML within the themes and get errors with WMPL until the plugins are installed?

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ChapterThemes says

@UBL , supporting WPML is not required..

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UBLThemes says

@UBL , supporting WPML is not required..

I know this, but Envato are pushing this.

They setup webinars which I watched.

They have created notes about how themes sell 5 times better with the compatibility.

They have even included it within the Compatible field on the WordPress upload form.

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