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billyf says

I think basic theme submission requirement should be obligatory support and theme updates for theme buyers at least for 3 years. Because with current situation almost all WordPress themes after year or so turn into garbage and sites running them are dysfunctional because theme authors don’t make updates for newer WordPress versions. 3 years should be obligatory minimum that theme will be compatible with new WordPress versions, otherwise what’s the point in buying WP theme?
Although this might sound good for buyer, but don’t you think the prices are too cheap if support is obligatory for 3 years? If this were to be implemented, I can see many authors leaving / not producing new items for the marketplace because 3 years is too long in the Internet world.

WordPress 3.0 was released in 2010 (about 3 years from now). Look at how many major releases were there in the past 3 years. It’s quite difficult to get a theme working in so many major releases when there are new / deprecated functions in each release (most themes here are not as ‘basic’ as free themes, hence they are more prone to problems due to the extra scripts / functions used for various effects / features). Even WordPress encourages developers to support only the 2 latest major WordPress versions.

When authors update their items, we don’t get extra exposure (i.e. we’re updating it but only the buyers know, and maybe those who used the not-so-efficient search in TF). So the time is ‘wasted’ in working with old items which do not generate much sales rather than working on new items with better design / features. This is also why there is information about the compatibility of the theme so that the buyers can decide whether it can run on what they are using.

In simpler words, obligatory support with the current pricing structure is impossible. Perhaps the prices should be increased by at least 3 folds if it were to be implemented, or as an extra ‘opt-in’ purchase (like how you pay for extended warranty for computers).

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ElyD says

I like the fact that you have to follow proper naming standards and the like, but some of phase 2 is distinctly worrying…

1) What about fonts like fontawesome – that is licensed to “theme developers”, not plugin developers. So therefore I assume I won’t be able to load up fontawesome within this ‘separate plugin’. While that isn’t a problem if they use my theme and plugin, it will become a problem if the shortcode is in the plugin and they change themes to a theme that doesn’t load up fontawesome (or whatever other symbol font the shortcode works off)....

2) What about themes from elsewhere, or existing ThemeForest themes – if my ‘separate plugin’ has a custom post type or shortcode with the same name, it’s going to create an issue when they swap to that theme, because even if the custom post type is called the same name it’s extremely unlikely that they contain identical meta data fields. So to prevent this we’re all going to have to name our shortcodes and custom post types with unique identifiers and then the users are eventually going to end up with loads of different plugins they HAVE to keep loaded that slows their site down to an unusable crawl.

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mpc says

So portfolio section for each theme also has to be inside the plugin?

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webcaos says

So portfolio section for each theme also has to be inside the plugin?

I’m pretty sure yes mpc ;)

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mpc says

Hi, sorry Envato but we need some clarifications. November is just around the corner. The idea looks great on the paper but in a real world it doesn’t make sens.

I can understand putting shortcodes in separate plugin (which will cause in loading tones of extra useless JS and CSS) but custom post types? When a user switches a theme it will have completely different markup structure. Our plugin with users brand new theme will look like crap. So my question is what is the point? In this thread there are tones of reasonable examples from real world without answer… Please explain what should we do and whats the point. I am personally working on a new project and still do not know how it should be structured to get approved.

Should we put everything in one plugin just to avoid having it inside the theme to get approved?

P.S I have a challenge for fellow authors lets use Twenty-thirteen and bunch of plugins. Everything except blog must be outside the theme so it wont matter which theme we are using :)

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PeterOravec says

What if I have Custom Post Type (CPT) related shortcode (for example last portfolio items)? Must be in shortcodes plugin or can be included in CPT plugin?

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Smartik says

What if I have Custom Post Type (CPT) related shortcode (for example last portfolio items)? Must be in shortcodes plugin or can be included in CPT plugin?
Seriously? Shortcodes Plugin and CPT Plugin are totally two different plugins. Of course the CPT shortcode should be in CPT plugin, this is how many plugins are done and should be done.
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webcaos says

Weel, i think shortcodes related to the plugin have to stay in the plugin. What i understood about phase two is this: Themes have to be related to the styling of the “website” without add new functionality to WP, unless the functionality is styling related (See Option Panels or default wp galleries styling, etc.). All what add new functionality to WP have to stay in a plugin, and after all is for this reason if WP have “plugins” and “themes”, are two different things, one have to think at the website styling and the other one have to add new functions on top of it ;)

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pixelgrade says

Hi, sorry Envato but we need some clarifications. November is just around the corner. The idea looks great on the paper but in a real world it doesn’t make sens.

I can understand putting shortcodes in separate plugin (which will cause in loading tones of extra useless JS and CSS) but custom post types? When a user switches a theme it will have completely different markup structure. Our plugin with users brand new theme will look like crap. So my question is what is the point? In this thread there are tones of reasonable examples from real world without answer… Please explain what should we do and whats the point. I am personally working on a new project and still do not know how it should be structured to get approved.

Should we put everything in one plugin just to avoid having it inside the theme to get approved?

P.S I have a challenge for fellow authors lets use Twenty-thirteen and bunch of plugins. Everything except blog must be outside the theme so it wont matter which theme we are using :)

The point of putting CPTs in plugins is quite simple: even if the new theme doesn’t know what to do with that custom post type (although your other themes may know ;) ) the user will still have access to the data of the old cpt from the backend and will be able to copy and paste it in the new theme’s data structure, if it chooses to. If not he will simply deactivate the plugin and all will be gone. It is as simple as this.

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OriginalEXE says

P.S I have a challenge for fellow authors lets use Twenty-thirteen and bunch of plugins. Everything except blog must be outside the theme so it wont matter which theme we are using :)
What is there in it except blog?
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