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SpletNet says

Hi!

I’m fairly new to the VideoHive and I apologize in advance if this was answered somewhere before. I found one similar thread but I couldn’t get a right answer from it.

Today one of my uploaded items was rejected. One of the reasons was interlacing. Now I’m unsure whether should I delete my other uploads in queue and fix them or not.

I was under the impression that 1080 50i was some sort of a standard, so most of my uploads are interlaced. I can of course deinterlace my footage and upload it in 1080 25p. But doesn’t that mean that some of the picture information will be lost?

Normally I wouldn’t be even asking, but my other two interlaced uploads are already accepted. Now I’m wondering if the reviewer maybe didn’t notice that and accepted them “by mistake”?

From now on I think I’ll just shoot with 50 progressive frames to avoid the confusion – that would be ok to upload, right?

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Altaf_ajju says

Hi!

I’m fairly new to the VideoHive and I apologize in advance if this was answered somewhere before. I found one similar thread but I couldn’t get a right answer from it.

Today one of my uploaded items was rejected. One of the reasons was interlacing. Now I’m unsure whether should I delete my other uploads in queue and fix them or not.

I was under the impression that 1080 50i was some sort of a standard, so most of my uploads are interlaced. I can of course deinterlace my footage and upload it in 1080 25p. But doesn’t that mean that some of the picture information will be lost?

Normally I wouldn’t be even asking, but my other two interlaced uploads are already accepted. Now I’m wondering if the reviewer maybe didn’t notice that and accepted them “by mistake”?

From now on I think I’ll just shoot with 50 progressive frames to avoid the confusion – that would be ok to upload, right?

If the reviewer has mentioned to de-interlace the footage, YES I would delete the other items in queue, fix it and re-upload it. Also, I would update the previous items which has slipped into the market already.

From NOW , you shall shoot in standard frame rate like 24fps, 25fps, 30fps. (all progressive).

I don’t think 50fps is necessary, if I want it to be in slow mo, I would capture it in 60 fps and interpret it as 30fps/25fps and then render the final.

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felt_tips Volunteer moderator says

I think it’s perfectly legitimate to upload 50i footage. Progressive is not better, it’s just different and 50i (or 60i) in the US are still standard for TV broadcast. The fact that you have a 100Hz progressive TV makes not difference to the signal coming in.

Interlacing is a much misunderstood thing, even by people who work in TV, but it’s there for a reason… it gives a totally different feel to footage and an effectively higher frame rate…. and one that feels closer to our actual perception of reality. This is bad for feature film (really we don’t want it to feel real) but good for TV news, sport, chat-shows and any other sort of material that should feel “live”. Try watching the news in progressive… it’s hard to accept as genuine – it feels like a story. A feature film interpolated up to an interlaced frame rate (as many modern TVs do by default) makes it feel like a second rate TV production – in the well-known “soap opera effect”.

I suppose the reason that interlaced footage is rejected is that it’s confusing to customers. Most are not experts, are probably using it for web or laptop playback and won’t know what to do with it. Or worse, they’ll think it’s some kind of mistake. The problem is that when you open up digitized interlaced material in Quicktime, it looks bad. It needs to be played back interlaced too – that requires a TV or a broadcast monitor.

You’re right of course… if you deinterlaced interlaced footage, you lose half of the spatial quality and half of the temporal resolution of your image. You effectively throw every second (half) frame away and interpolate the information from what remains. If you want progressive as an end product, it’s much better to shoot progressive.

However, I’d also say that if I was buying a graphic for incorporation into a broadcast TV news ident of some kind, then I would expect it to be interlaced, as in all likelihood so would the end product be… The same for all lower thirds / graphical overlays that are intended for broadcast. If they’re not delivered as interlaced, then they’re probably no good.

I think some clarification is required here by staff and reviewers.

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felt_tips Volunteer moderator says

From NOW , you shall shoot in standard frame rate like 24fps, 25fps, 30fps. (all progressive).

Not entirely correct, Altaf. In Europe, the PAL television standard runs at 50i. NTSC in the US is 60i (well 59.94i) The PAL variant is technically 25 full frames per second when digitized. Into each frame are packed two half height pictures, separated by 1/50th of a second and saved on alternate lines. This is interlacing – and since TVs scan first the odd lines of a frame and then the even lines 1/50th second later, you see an effective 50 frames per second. This is known as 50i, but digitized, the frame rate that you is reported is 25 frames per second.

25fps / 50i is a standard
30fps / 60i is a standard
60i / 24P (with 3:2 pulldown) is a standard of sorts

The last one is a kind of hack whereby the frames of a film are divided over the interlaced fields of an NTSC signal in a 3:2 cadence. In Europe, feature films are just played back 4% faster to match them to the 25fps frame rate. Maybe these days they do some kind of clever interpolation.

If I wanted to be a real stickler for accuracy, then I’d have to point out that the NTSC standard is not 30fps, but 29.97. I believe that this was originally some adjustment that was necessary with the advent of color TV, but I can’t quite remember.

If you want a live TV feel, then 50/60i is very much necessary.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTSC
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAL
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3:2_pulldown#23pulldown
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SpletNet says

Thank you both for reply. In my uploads I always include a help file for less technical users where I explain that they have to deinterlace the footage if they’re seeing unwanted horizontal stripes/lines.

However, if someone would like to use my footage for a television project, I think they would rather have original interlaced footage.

Like felt_tips said, I would be very grateful for some clarification from the staff or reviewers: interlaced footage – yes, better quality or no, more friendly to the average user?

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baf2681 Envato team says

Ok so here is the thing with interlaced footage:

As long as it doesn’t look to bad then we will accept it. The thing is with interlaced footage is that the more movement or motion in a clip then the more noticeable the interlacing is.

Most buyers here aren’t familiar with the run down felt just described nor do most people bother to even educated themselves about interlacing vs. progressive either.

To make it easier just use your best judgement. If the interlacing looks heavy or your clip has a lot of motion then de-interlacing or progressive may be a better solution. we are just try to prevent buyers from asking for refunds because they think the footage is bad, when in reality they just don’t know how to properly work with interlaced footage.

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SpletNet says

Thanks for your quick reply baf2681. You’re now officially my favourite reviewer. :)

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dorde says

I’m just curious which player can properly play quicktime 1080i without visible fields, but fluid (with feel of doubled frame rate)? I mean software player on windows, not player connected to tv :)
When I shot something in 50i with sd pal camcorder, I always deinterlace final video for client as optional format for upload to video hosting site.
M’kay if videohiver upload interlaced video, but I suppose that preview should be deinterlaced for flv preview, right?

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felt_tips Volunteer moderator says

The only players I’ve ever come across that handle interlaced are DVD / mpeg players.

It’s a shame. Interlaced has its place… also on the computer desktop (although on a computer desktop, you can achieve the same perceptual results as interlaced, by doubling the progressive frame-rate).

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