108 posts
  • Exclusive Author
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Envato Studio (Microlancer) Beta Tester
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Has been a member for 1-2 years
designedbydash says

W3C validation as a requirement seems to be completely random. If you flick through the recently submitted Wordpress themes and validate them a large percentage of them will not validate. One of our themes just got soft rejected and one of the reasons was W3C validation whereas only an hour before a theme with no less than 260 W3C validation errors was approved. I am not fussed whether it’s a requirement or not, personally I think it’s a bit pointless, but it would just be nice to know if it is or if it isn’t – and more importantly for it to either be enforced across the marketplace or not at all. The same goes with the other requirements, it seems to be somewhat random whether a certain criteria is required based on the reviewer.

The whole review process these days seems random. Our last theme was soft rejected with 4 minor points, such as not running Theme Check, whereas this time we’ve been linked to a developer plugin (that includes Theme Check and some other stuff) that runs all sorts of tests as well as requiring unit testing. This was never required last time and it just seems like you can either get a nice easy review such as our first one or a somewhat over-the-top review like our one today. I know some things could’ve been added since last time, but that doesn’t explain the W3C part plus I don’t think this is a one-off – it just seems so random.

I assume there is a checklist that is followed, however it just doesn’t seem like that’s being followed properly in some cases.

356 posts
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Malaysia
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
billyf says

I think it might be due to their new guidelines which they started using before announcing to the authors. Some time ago some themes were rejected because the new guideline forbids users from using web fonts from Google. The latest guideline for that is, we must either provide the font files in the package or provide fallback for fonts (using some system fonts such as Arial etc.).

Probably now there is this new guideline for reviewing WordPress themes, who knows.

108 posts
  • Exclusive Author
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Envato Studio (Microlancer) Beta Tester
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Has been a member for 1-2 years
designedbydash says

I think it might be due to their new guidelines which they started using before announcing to the authors. Some time ago some themes were rejected because the new guideline forbids users from using web fonts from Google. The latest guideline for that is, we must either provide the font files in the package or provide fallback for fonts (using some system fonts such as Arial etc.). Probably now there is this new guideline for reviewing WordPress themes, who knows.

It just seems all so random, I don’t see how we’re supposed to plan our themes and construct them in the most efficient way without knowing exactly what’s required. It’s like trying to jump through hoops, but in the dark with no guidance.

1174 posts How's the surf doing?
  • Forum Superstar
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 250 000 and 1 000 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Referred between 200 and 499 users
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 3-4 years
+2 more
tommusrhodus says

It depends on the errors, I had a theme rejected due to validation, there was about 56, I checked each and every one until I got to having about 42 left.

Of these half were due to to an ampersand in a google maps embed, and the rest were due to wpautop() and short codes. I genuinely fixed everything in my control, since we’re not allowed much control over wpautop() and then informed the reviewer of what I had done and what was left.

Approved. In short, wpautop() can be pure evil! :)

108 posts
  • Exclusive Author
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Envato Studio (Microlancer) Beta Tester
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Has been a member for 1-2 years
designedbydash says

I’m curious, has anyone else been asked to JSHint their custom JS code as one of the soft rejection notices? While I’m at it, also been asked to use http://codex.wordpress.org/Theme_Unit_Test?

Going back to the W3C validation, I’ve just picked out 5 at random and 4 of them failed with over 20 errors a piece. These were all approved either today or yesterday.

Along the same lines, I just did the same but with JSHint and the same result – 4 out of 5 failing. This is all just really annoying, to be soft rejected when it seems every other theme goes through with the same “problems”.

82 posts
  • Bought between 100 and 499 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 3-4 years
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
subwaymatch says

I think it might be due to their new guidelines which they started using before announcing to the authors. Some time ago some themes were rejected because the new guideline forbids users from using web fonts from Google. The latest guideline for that is, we must either provide the font files in the package or provide fallback for fonts (using some system fonts such as Arial etc.). Probably now there is this new guideline for reviewing WordPress themes, who knows.

Wait, authors are not allowed to use Google fonts without a fallback anymore?? :-( So if I’m applying Open Sans as: font-family: ‘Open Sans’, ‘Helvetica Neue’, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;

Does this qualify as a fallback? Or do we specifically need to have Open Sans included in the package?

420 posts
  • Elite Author
  • Bought between 50 and 99 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Sold between 100 000 and 250 000 dollars
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Envato Studio (Microlancer) Beta Tester
  • Grew a moustache for the Envato Movember competition
  • Referred between 10 and 49 users
  • United Kingdom
Jaynesh says


I think it might be due to their new guidelines which they started using before announcing to the authors. Some time ago some themes were rejected because the new guideline forbids users from using web fonts from Google. The latest guideline for that is, we must either provide the font files in the package or provide fallback for fonts (using some system fonts such as Arial etc.). Probably now there is this new guideline for reviewing WordPress themes, who knows.

Wait, authors are not allowed to use Google fonts without a fallback anymore?? :-( So if I’m applying Open Sans as: font-family: ‘Open Sans’, ‘Helvetica Neue’, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;

Does this qualify as a fallback? Or do we specifically need to have Open Sans included in the package?

I’d also like some clarification on this. It seems silly to cater to offline users for a product that is used online and I don’t think any web developers would be working without an internet connection, even if they are working locally.

356 posts
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Malaysia
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
billyf says

Wait, authors are not allowed to use Google fonts without a fallback anymore?? :-( So if I’m applying Open Sans as: font-family: ‘Open Sans’, ‘Helvetica Neue’, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; Does this qualify as a fallback? Or do we specifically need to have Open Sans included in the package?
Using the code above would be good enough because Arial is already in most (if not all) computers.

If you use the code below, however, you need to provide the font file in the package : font-family:’Open Sans’;

Again, this is based on what I have read some time ago in another thread.

82 posts
  • Bought between 100 and 499 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 3-4 years
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
subwaymatch says


Wait, authors are not allowed to use Google fonts without a fallback anymore?? :-( So if I’m applying Open Sans as: font-family: ‘Open Sans’, ‘Helvetica Neue’, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; Does this qualify as a fallback? Or do we specifically need to have Open Sans included in the package?
Using the code above would be good enough because Arial is already in most (if not all) computers.

If you use the code below, however, you need to provide the font file in the package : font-family:’Open Sans’;

Again, this is based on what I have read some time ago in another thread.

That makes sense. Thanks for clarifying.

by
by
by
by
by
by