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chrisatlemon says

Hi all,

I have prepared a grunge background image pack. Each background is 3375×2675 at 300 dpi. Flattened that makes a 70 MB PSD , fourtysomething when Zipped.

That means I can get about 10 of them into and upload to GR. I would however like to include considerably more because I want to offer various colour versions, and various levels of grit etc.

What is the best lossless image format? TIFF without compression gets me down to about 40 odd MB per file. Or what image format would you suggest to distribute my background as?

I want to offer the best possible quality, but I also want to include about 20 high-resolution background files in my package.

Thanks for any help

Chris

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graphicmind says

I would make a single PSD with the main effects and save each individual background as a JPG image file since this would save a considerable amount of space. Also, I would advice a size smaller than 3375×2675 pixels (maybe 2560×1600) since this will also save you some space.

I don’t know much about image formats other than for JPG . And PNG (with or without compression) usually saves larger image files than JPG .

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chrisatlemon says

You are right, it’s probably the best idea. I will Leave the base files as psd and then save all variations as 100% quality JPG .

Thanks for that ;)

Chris

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cspcreative says

I must be missing something! How do you get a 70MB .psd from a flattened image at that resolution? I saved an uncompressed .tif at that resolution for 25.9MB! I would understand that file size from a layered document but not from a flattened file.

Check to make sure you’re not saving extra alpha channels in your document — they add to the overall file size.

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deiby says

It might be the preview and associated info the psd stores. If you put a white layer on the top or only had the white background visible it would reduce the size when you save it.

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chrisatlemon says

Jeez! indeed, if I add a white background layer and make the main texture layer invisible the whole thing comes down to 33 MB.

What’s up with that! Is there anyway around this? It’s a bit silly presenting my files with all layers hidden and when the customer opens the file he only sees a white layer … It may be trivial to us, but I’m not sure I can get this through the review?

Cheers

Chris

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matu says

This could be something to look into http://www.smushit.com/ysmush.it/

” Smush.it uses optimization techniques specific to image format to remove unnecessary bytes from image files. It is a “lossless” tool, which means it optimizes the images without changing their look or visual quality. After Smush.it runs on a web page it reports how many bytes would be saved by optimizing the page’s images and provides a downloadable zip file with the minimized image files. “

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deiby says

Jeez! indeed, if I add a white background layer and make the main texture layer invisible the whole thing comes down to 33 MB.

What’s up with that! Is there anyway around this? It’s a bit silly presenting my files with all layers hidden and when the customer opens the file he only sees a white layer … It may be trivial to us, but I’m not sure I can get this through the review?

Cheers

Chris

Not sure if there is another method. Try setting preferences > file handling > image preview to “never save”, but it may not make any difference or still increase the size some. The blank white layer can be the top layer with the other layer visibilities still on so the action of turning it off or deleting it is simpler for the end user. Name it something informative like… delete me! :)

Review has never had a problem with this technique before, it helps bring large files down in size.

Also depending on your file, you can use JPG at 80 or 90% for the extras without any visual difference. JPG by nature is lossy so I don’t think it matters and brings it down even more.

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