Which cart is growing in popularity - WOOCOMMERCE or OPENCART? And which one would you choose?

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SpyroPress says

Hi,

I think Kriesi has clear all the concerns. I have also built a shop with over 3,000 products.

Visit Here

Thanks
-S

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oyohan says

I’ve used all 3 and magento has the most features but is resource intensive and simply a bitch to learn for most people. Their product import/export is a pain and if you have clothing products, it’s more of a pain. anything with multiple colors or sizes means configurable products which is a pain. try teaching your clients how to use magmi, they’ll look at you cross-eyed.

I agree with Kresi, wp eCommerce is fine for limited items but if you want to scale, go with opencart. it has almost all the features of magento and is much easier to learn.

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TamaraDella says

Both shopping carts have their pros and cons. In order to make a right decision you should compare two platforms according to your special needs.

Main benefits of WooCommerce are robust tax settings and options, secure customer account section, possibility to sell physical and digital products. However, platform has lack of currencies, languages, shipping methods, inability to add product variants. Nonetheless, lately on e-Commerce market appeared WooCommerce 2. New shopping cart version is aimed to improve store management facilities, developing process and customer shopping experience. You can find more detailed information about these improvements here goo.gl/u2tqWf

From the other hand, we have OpenCart, which is independent shopping cart. It is lightweight, it means your site will be fast. All you have to do to set up a store is to:
  1. Install an application on a computer.
  2. Choose theme.
  3. Configure functions and modules like languages, payment and shipment methods.
  4. Add products and write product details.

Shopping cart is really free. Multi store functionality will help you to manage several different stores from one admin panel.

Now you have to think which kind of online store do you need. If it is middle store with blog or forum, choose WooCommerce. If you have no programming skills and want large store, choose OpenCart.

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crockfordcarlisle says

As a developer and designer working for an agency I can give you my two cents.

1) I wouldn’t use the WP eCommerce plugin again if my house was on fire with all my guitars inside and I could save them by installing it. Mainly because there is next to no support available and when I have contacted the supplier I didn’t receive a reply. I also bought several other plugins from related developers and could not get them to work. I just could never rely on it and therefore didn’t have any faith in it. I honestly am surprised it “works” for some people.

Mind you this was two years ago. Perhaps it’s better now.

2 ) I then moved past Wordpress straight into Magento. I’ve learnt to build the sites from scratch and currently manage around a dozen of them. It’s a very solid platform. There are almost too many things you can do with it. Problem is, doing the simplest thing takes time (even just clicking down to the 11th folder to change a style sheet or javascript file). It’s resource heavy on shared hosting because it really is built for “proper” stores. So move it to a VPS at least. It’ll run on shared hosting, you’ll just be waiting a while every time you click on anything.

I’ve also created a quoting system with Magento which works quite well for clients minus a few glitches here and there it does the job.

Overall I like Magento some days, I don’t like it others. If I had to build a store with 100k products, I wouldn’t hesitate to use it. I just know if won’t fall over if there isn’t a very good reason. Particularly as it is an ECommerce platform first and foremost. Not a blogging platform or a CMS.

3) WooCommerce in my opinion has come a long way in the last couple of years. I use it everyday and find it dead easy to make changes, add things in and edit the structure through it’s child theme folder inside my theme (which is a godsend). If you’ve got a store with anything less than 10,000 products I’d say it’s a goer.

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vmerheb says

As a developer and designer working for an agency I can give you my two cents.

1) I wouldn’t use the WP eCommerce plugin again if my house was on fire with all my guitars inside and I could save them by installing it. Mainly because there is next to no support available and when I have contacted the supplier I didn’t receive a reply. I also bought several other plugins from related developers and could not get them to work. I just could never rely on it and therefore didn’t have any faith in it. I honestly am surprised it “works” for some people.

Mind you this was two years ago. Perhaps it’s better now.

2 ) I then moved past Wordpress straight into Magento. I’ve learnt to build the sites from scratch and currently manage around a dozen of them. It’s a very solid platform. There are almost too many things you can do with it. Problem is, doing the simplest thing takes time (even just clicking down to the 11th folder to change a style sheet or javascript file). It’s resource heavy on shared hosting because it really is built for “proper” stores. So move it to a VPS at least. It’ll run on shared hosting, you’ll just be waiting a while every time you click on anything.

I’ve also created a quoting system with Magento which works quite well for clients minus a few glitches here and there it does the job.

Overall I like Magento some days, I don’t like it others. If I had to build a store with 100k products, I wouldn’t hesitate to use it. I just know if won’t fall over if there isn’t a very good reason. Particularly as it is an ECommerce platform first and foremost. Not a blogging platform or a CMS.

3) WooCommerce in my opinion has come a long way in the last couple of years. I use it everyday and find it dead easy to make changes, add things in and edit the structure through it’s child theme folder inside my theme (which is a godsend). If you’ve got a store with anything less than 10,000 products I’d say it’s a goer.

I think you may have just answered my question also.

I have a client asking me to create an e-commerce solution for his existing WP site, to cater for a very small range of products (25 – 35 products).

With those kind of numbers it sounds like WooCommerce is more than accommodating, however was on the fence whether to integrate WooCommerce or build his online store through opencart.

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